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Hi I am having trouble with the onmouseout function in a absolute positoned div. When the mouse hits a child element in the div, the mouseout event fires, but I do not want it to fire until the mouse is out of the parent, absolute div.

How can I prevent the mouseout event from firing when it hits a child element WITHOUT jquery.

I know this has something to do with event bubbling, but I am having no luck on finding out how to work this out. A similar post I found here: How to disable mouseout events triggered by child elements?

How ever that solution uses jquery.

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I ended up solving the problem using a timeout and clearing it on hover of the child elements –  John Jan 16 '11 at 10:05
    
Hi, I have looked at your demo but when I go over the elements in the bottom right panel nothing happens? –  John Jan 16 '11 at 19:48
    
Found this answer if you are looking to prevent a mouseout on the parent event when you mouseover a child element: javascript mouseover/mouseout. –  user823527 Aug 10 '12 at 23:31
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14 Answers

up vote 39 down vote accepted
function onMouseOut(event) {
        //this is the original element the event handler was assigned to
        var e = event.toElement || event.relatedTarget;
        if (e.parentNode == this || e == this) {
           return;
        }
    alert('MouseOut');
    // handle mouse event here!
}

document.getElementById('parent').addEventListener('mouseout',onMouseOut,true);

I made a quick JsFiddle demo, with all the CSS and HTML needed, check it out...

EDIT FIXED link for cross-browser support http://jsfiddle.net/RH3tA/9/

NOTE that this only checks the immediate parent, if the parent div had nested children then you have to somehow traverse through the elements parents looking for the "Orginal element"

EDIT example for nested children EDIT Fixed for hopefully cross-browser

function makeMouseOutFn(elem){
    var list = traverseChildren(elem);
    return function onMouseOut(event) {
        var e = event.toElement || event.relatedTarget;
        if (!!~list.indexOf(e)) {
            return;
        }
        alert('MouseOut');
        // handle mouse event here!
    };
}

//using closure to cache all child elements
var parent = document.getElementById("parent");
parent.addEventListener('mouseout',makeMouseOutFn(parent),true);

//quick and dirty DFS children traversal, 
function traverseChildren(elem){
    var children = [];
    var q = [];
    q.push(elem);
    while (q.length > 0) {
      var elem = q.pop();
      children.push(elem);
      pushAll(elem.children);
    }
    function pushAll(elemArray){
      for(var i=0; i < elemArray.length; i++) {
        q.push(elemArray[i]);
      }
    }
    return children;
}

And a new JSFiddle http://jsfiddle.net/amasad/TH9Hv/8/ EDIT updated link

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You should add a mouseout event to the fiddle so it can be tested. An alert or something should do. –  John Jan 16 '11 at 19:54
    
Sorry looks like you have alert('MouseOut') , however it does not work for me? I have hit run with no JS library option –  John Jan 16 '11 at 19:55
1  
check out edits –  Amjad Masad Jan 18 '11 at 4:18
1  
Thanks it works great! –  John Jan 18 '11 at 19:38
2  
What if you have grand children? or great grand children? i.e. can you have a recursive solution instead of just immidiate children ? –  Roozbeh15 Jan 27 '12 at 23:48
show 7 more comments

Here's a more elegant solution based on what came below. it accounts for event bubbling up from more than one level of children. It also accounts for cross-browser issues.

function onMouseOut(this, event) {
//this is the original element the event handler was assigned to
   var e = event.toElement || event.relatedTarget;

//check for all children levels (checking from bottom up)
while(e && e.parentNode && e.parentNode != window) {
    if (e.parentNode == this||  e == this) {
        if(e.preventDefault) e.preventDefault();
        return false;
    }
    e = e.parentNode;
}

//Do something u need here
}

document.getElementById('parent').addEventListener('mouseout',onMouseOut,true);
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Worked for me, thanks! –  Rich Apodaca Mar 28 '13 at 14:38
    
You sir made my day. Thanks. –  jpruiz114 Jun 8 '13 at 0:13
    
Sam Elie, this seems to not to be working on IE, Safari or Opera. Do you have a cross-browser version of this script? It works like a charm in Firefox and Chrome. Thanks. –  jpruiz114 Jun 13 '13 at 21:18
1  
When I paste the above function into my script, Dreamweaver and FF throw an error on the first line, "function onMouseOut(this, event) {". It looks like you're not allowed to put "this" as a parameter. I guess it kind of works when I leave out "this" from the input params, but I don't know for sure, because "I don't know what I don't know". –  Gregory Lewis Jul 21 '13 at 15:41
1  
I also had the same issue pop up in Chrome on the same line, excluding this from the function definition line @GregoryLewis mentioned fixed the issue. Also for more cross browser support, try this: if (window.addEventListener){ document.getElementById('parent').addEventListener('mouseout',onMouseOut,true); } else if (window.attachEvent){ document.getElementById('parent').attachEvent("onmouseout",onMouseOut); } –  DWils Jan 29 at 23:53
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For a simpler pure CSS solution that works in some cases (IE11+), one could remove children's pointer-events by setting them to none

.parent * {
     pointer-events: none;
}
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Brilliant! Totally just fixed my issue! –  Anna_MediaGirl Apr 2 at 21:15
    
This should be the first or at least second answer, I was ready to go with the hassle of event listeners and this totally fixed my issue too. So simple ! –  Mickael V. May 12 at 21:05
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Thanks to Amjad Masad that inspired me.

I've the following solution which seems to work in IE9, FF and Chrome and the code is quite short (without the complex closure and transverse child things) :

    DIV.onmouseout=function(e){
        // check and loop relatedTarget.parentNode
        // ignore event triggered mouse overing any child element or leaving itself
        var obj=e.relatedTarget;
        while(obj!=null){
            if(obj==this){
                return;
            }
            obj=obj.parentNode;
        }
        // now perform the actual action you want to do only when mouse is leaving the DIV
    }
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I think Quirksmode has all the answers you need (different browsers bubbling behaviour and the mouseenter/mouseleave events), but I think the most common conclusion to that event bubbling mess is the use of a framework like JQuery or Mootools (which has the mouseenter and mouseleave events, which are exactly what you intuited would happen).

Have a look at how they do it, if you want, do it yourself
or you can create your custom "lean mean" version of Mootools with just the event part (and its dependencies).

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I make it work like a charm with this:

function HideLayer(theEvent){
 var MyDiv=document.getElementById('MyDiv');
 if(MyDiv==(!theEvent?window.event:theEvent.target)){
  MyDiv.style.display='none';
 }
}

Ah, and MyDiv tag is like this:

<div id="MyDiv" onmouseout="JavaScript: HideLayer(event);">
 <!-- Here whatever divs, inputs, links, images, anything you want... -->
<div>

This way, when onmouseout goes to a child, grand-child, etc... the style.display='none' is not executed; but when onmouseout goes out of MyDiv it runs.

So no need to stop propagation, use timers, etc...

Thanks for examples, i could make this code from them.

Hope this helps someone.

Also can be improved like this:

function HideLayer(theLayer,theEvent){
 if(theLayer==(!theEvent?window.event:theEvent.target)){
  theLayer.style.display='none';
 }
}

And then the DIVs tags like this:

<div onmouseout="JavaScript: HideLayer(this,event);">
 <!-- Here whatever divs, inputs, links, images, anything you want... -->
<div>

So more general, not only for one div and no need to add id="..." on each layer.

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I've found a very simple solution,

just use the onmouseleave="myfunc()" event than the onmousout="myfunc()" event

In my code it worked!!

Example:

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
   function myFunc(){
      document.getElementById('hide_div').style.display = 'none';
   }
   function ShowFunc(){
      document.getElementById('hide_div').style.display = 'block';
   }
</script>
</head>
<body>
<div onmouseleave="myFunc()" style='border:double;width:50%;height:50%;position:absolute;top:25%;left:25%;'>
   Hover mouse here
   <div id='child_div' style='border:solid;width:25%;height:25%;position:absolute;top:10%;left:10%;'>
      CHILD <br/> It doesn't fires if you hover mouse over this child_div
   </div>
</div>
<div id="hide_div" >TEXT</div>
<a href='#' onclick="ShowFunc()">Show "TEXT"</a>
</body>
</html>

Same Example with mouseout function:

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
   function myFunc(){
      document.getElementById('hide_div').style.display = 'none';
   }
   function ShowFunc(){
      document.getElementById('hide_div').style.display = 'block';
   }
</script>
</head>
<body>
<div onmouseout="myFunc()" style='border:double;width:50%;height:50%;position:absolute;top:25%;left:25%;'>
   Hover mouse here
   <div id='child_div' style='border:solid;width:25%;height:25%;position:absolute;top:10%;left:10%;'>
      CHILD <br/> It fires if you hover mouse over this child_div
   </div>
</div>
<div id="hide_div">TEXT</div>
<a href='#' onclick="ShowFunc()">Show "TEXT"</a>
</body>
</html>

Hope it helps :)

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---- tl;dr ---- –  msangel Oct 21 '13 at 9:11
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Try mouseleave()

Example :

<div id="parent" mouseleave="function">
   <div id="child">

   </div>
</div>

;)

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There are two ways to handle this.

1) Check the event.target result in your callback to see if it matches your parent div

var g_ParentDiv;

function OnMouseOut(event) {
    if (event.target != g_ParentDiv) {
        return;
    }
    // handle mouse event here!
};


window.onload = function() {
    g_ParentDiv = document.getElementById("parentdiv");
    g_ParentDiv.onmouseout = OnMouseOut;
};

<div id="parentdiv">
    <img src="childimage.jpg" id="childimg" />
</div>

2) Or use event capturing and call event.stopPropagation in the callback function

var g_ParentDiv;

function OnMouseOut(event) {

    event.stopPropagation(); // don't let the event recurse into children

    // handle mouse event here!
};


window.onload = function() {
    g_ParentDiv = document.getElementById("parentdiv");
    g_ParentDiv.addEventListener("mouseout", OnMouseOut, true); // pass true to enable event capturing so parent gets event callback before children
};

<div id="parentdiv">
    <img src="childimage.jpg" id="childimg" />
</div>
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How can I make this work for onmouseout instead of onmouseover? –  John Jan 15 '11 at 6:06
    
Oops. My bad. I just change all the "mouseover" references to "mouseout" in the code above. That should do it for you. –  selbie Jan 15 '11 at 6:57
    
For the first method, the event.target always matches the parent element when the mouse goes over the child element, so it does not work –  John Jan 15 '11 at 17:38
    
Same thing occurs for the second method. When the mouse enters a child element it still triggers the event –  John Jan 15 '11 at 17:44
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I check the original element's offset to get the page coordinates of the element's bounds, then make sure the mouseout action is only triggered when the mouseout is out of those bounds. Dirty but it works.

$(el).live('mouseout', function(event){
    while(checkPosition(this, event)){
        console.log("mouseovering including children")
    }
    console.log("moused out of the whole")
})

var checkPosition = function(el, event){
    var position = $(el).offset()
    var height = $(el).height()
    var width = $(el).width()
    if (event.pageY > position.top 
|| event.pageY < (position.top + height) 
|| event.pageX > position.left 
|| event.pageX < (position.left + width)){
    return true
}
}
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var elem = $('#some-id');
elem.mouseover(function () {
   // Some code here
}).mouseout(function (event) {
   var e = event.toElement || event.relatedTarget;
   if (elem.has(e).length > 0) return;

   // Some code here
});
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Please give some explanation with your anwser. –  Sebass van Boxel Oct 2 '12 at 17:25
    
Well, it starts out using jQuery... –  Pimp Trizkit Oct 31 '12 at 11:46
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<div id="parent" onmouseout="if (this == event.target) YourFunction(this)">
    <div id="child">

    </div>
</div>
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If you added (or have) a CSS class or id to the parent element, then you can do something like this:

<div id="parent">
  <div>
  </div>
</div>

JavaScript:
document.getElementById("parent").onmouseout = function(e) {
  e = e ? e : window.event //For IE
  if(e.target.id == "parent") {
    //Do your stuff
  }
}

So stuff only gets executed when the event is on the parent div.

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If you're using jQuery you can also use the "mouseleave" function, which deals with all of this for you.

$('#thetargetdiv').mouseenter(do_something);
$('#thetargetdiv').mouseleave(do_something_else);

do_something will fire when the mouse enters thetargetdiv or any of its children, do_something_else will only fire when the mouse leaves thetargetdiv and any of its children.

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