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What are the different usages for the #, ., and > symbols and what do they reference?

For example, I know these two:

div#id {}     // <div id="id" />
div.class {}  // <div class="class" />

However, there are others which I don't understand:

div#id element
div#id>element
div#id.class
div#id .class
div#id>element#id .class

Etc. Any insights?

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4  
-1 Please at least look for a tutorial/reference. W3C: CSS2 Selectors. All the details -- tutorial not include. –  user166390 Jan 15 '11 at 4:39
    
I did, but still do not understand. the result looks different on different browsers. –  Jake Jan 15 '11 at 4:46
3  
@Jake: IE6 for one does not support > at all. Otherwise these should be supported by all modern (and half-modern) browsers. –  BoltClock Jan 15 '11 at 4:51
    
@BoltClock that is one life-saver. =) –  Jake Jan 15 '11 at 4:53
    
@Jake: Oh hello fellow Singaporean! –  BoltClock Jan 15 '11 at 5:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

As pst says, you should really read up more on your own. I'll add that you can experiment using Firebug or an online tool like jsFiddle to see live results. But I understand not everyone combines ID and class selectors, and the fact that your selectors are so similar and bunched like that can be confusing, so here goes:

The > symbol is called the child combinator, and is different from whitespace (the descendant combinator) in that > only looks one level deep in the DOM hierarchy.

Compare the first two selectors:

  • div#id element /* With a space */

    Select an element
    which descends from (is contained anywhere within) a div of id="id".

    Would match either of these:

    <div id="id">
        <element />
    </div>
    

    <div id="id">
        <div class="class">
            <element />
        </div>
    </div>
    
  • div#id>element /* With a > sign */

    Select an element
    which is a child of (is contained directly within) a div of id="id".

    Will only match this:

    <div id="id">
        <element />
    </div>
    

    But not this because there is an intermediate div.class occurring between element and div#id:

    <div id="id">
        <div class="class">
            <element />
        </div>
    </div>
    

Because the space represents the descendant combinator, it's significant in CSS selector syntax (except when used between other combinators and simple selectors, e.g. E > F and E>F are the same).

Compare the next two selectors:

  • div#id.class /* No spaces anywhere */

    Select a div of both id="id" and class="class".

    By omitting the space, you are chaining three things together:

    1. The element selector (div),

    2. The ID selector (#id), and

    3. The class selector (.class).

    Thus a single element must satisfy all three selectors in order to be targeted by its rule. In HTML, this means it has to have both attributes, like so: <div id="id" class="class">

  • div#id .class /* With a space */

    Select any element of class="class"
    which descends from a div of id="id".

    Notice the whitespace separating div#id and .class. This means .class applies to a totally different element.

    Would match either of these:

    <div id="id">
        <p class="class"></p>
    </div>
    

    <div id="id">
        <div>
            <p class="class"></p>
        </div>
    </div>
    

    But nothing here will be matched because there's no .class to look for within div#id:

    <div id="id">
        <element />
    </div>
    

    And not this either, for the same reason:

    <div id="id" class="class"></div>
    

The last selector just involves putting it all together:

  • div#id>element#id .class

    Funnily enough, the corresponding HTML structure would be invalid because you can't have more than one element with the same ID, but anyway:

    Select any element of class="class"
    which descends from an element of of id="id"
    which is a child of a div of of id="id".

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+1 for answering in proper way instead of downvoting and closing. –  NAVEED Jan 15 '11 at 4:45
2  
@NAVEED: Downvoting I can understand. But closing? I dunno. –  BoltClock Jan 15 '11 at 4:46
    
@BoltClock: Some people are making this platform only for experts. Beginners are not appreciated well sometimes and closed. –  NAVEED Jan 15 '11 at 4:49
    
I think beginners are more inclined to post without searching and that's what you're seeing @NAVEED. –  Michael Irigoyen Jan 15 '11 at 4:51
1  
@BoltClock Nice answer. It might be useful to note that a>b and a > b are identical. I prefer the latter for readability. From the CSS2 specification: "Combinators are: white space, '>', and '+'. White space may appear between a combinator and the simple selectors around it." –  user166390 Jan 15 '11 at 6:33
  • # selects an ID (<div id="something"></div> -> #something)
  • . selects a class (<div class="something"></div> -> .something)
  • > selects a child directly under a specific parent (<div><p></p></div> -> div > p)
  • <space> selects descendants under the specified parent (<div><p id="one"></p><p id="two"></p></div> -> div #one
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4  
+1 for succinctness, but your fourth bullet point should say "descendants", as "children" always implies only one degree of separation. –  Phrogz Jan 15 '11 at 4:49
1  
They should really do something about code blocks missing the padding when occurring in lists... but yeah +1 for succinctness. –  BoltClock Jan 15 '11 at 5:09

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