Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Buyer model has two fields:

  • name (string)
  • position (integer)

I would like to increment the position of all buyers whose position >= N.

What is the easiest method to do this ?

Is that possible to achieve this using only one query ?

share|improve this question
    
In the console or a method in the app? Is this a one-off fix? –  George Anderson Jan 15 '11 at 5:02
    
as method in app –  Misha Moroshko Jan 15 '11 at 5:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You could use:

Buyer.update_all("position = position + 1", ["position >= ?", n])

This would generate the query, if n = 25:

UPDATE "buyers" SET position = position + 1 WHERE (position >= 25)

Edit:

Being that you have UNIQUE database constraints, you have a couple of options. For both options, I recommend running them in a transaction. First, you can update each field individually in reverse order, but this will cause you to have N+1 queries. For a small dataset, this will not be a problem, but for larger dataset, this could impact performance.

Buyer.transaction do
   Buyer.select("id, position").where(["position >= ?", n]).order("position DESC").each do |buyer|
      buyer.position += 1
      buyer.save
   end
end

The other option, to avoid N+1 queries, is to change the position increments to 100 (or 10). This will allow you to update the positions in two queries, rather than N+1. So instead of having positions 1, 2, 3, etc. you would have 100, 200, 300, etc. Then to do an update, you would increment all values by 101, and then follow update with an update to subtract the 1.

Buyer.transaction do
   Buyer.where(["position >= ?", n]).scoping do
      Buyer.update_all("position = position + 101")
      Buyer.update_all("position = position - 1")
   end
end
share|improve this answer
    
In what order the positions will be updated ? If for example there are 10 buyers with positions 1 to 10 respectively, and n = 6, I would like first 10 to become 11, then 9 to become 10, then 8 to become 9 and so on. The position is UNIQUE so I cannot have two equal positions at any time. –  Misha Moroshko Jan 15 '11 at 6:23
    
If you are using Rails validations, you will not run into validation errors using this method. –  Sean Hill Jan 15 '11 at 14:27
    
UNIQUE is a database constraint in my case. –  Misha Moroshko Jan 16 '11 at 12:31
    
Please see my updated answer. –  Sean Hill Jan 16 '11 at 16:08

If this is ad-hoc, you could drop the constraint/index, run the update, and then re-add it using regular old SQL.

share|improve this answer
class Buyer < ActiveRecord::Base
  scope :positioned_at_or_above, lambda {|pos| where("position >= ?", pos) }

  def self.increment(amount, position_threshold)
    Buyer.positioned_at_or_above(position_threshold).each{|buyer| buyer.update_attributes(:position => buyer.position + amount)}
  end
end

-

increment ∴ rails c                                                                                                                                                               
Loading development environment (Rails 3.0.3)
>> Buyer.count
=> 0
>> (1..10).each {|idx| Buyer.create(:name => "Buyer ##{idx}", :position => idx)}
=> 1..10
>> pp Buyer.all
[#<Buyer id: 11, name: "Buyer #1", position: 1>,
 #<Buyer id: 12, name: "Buyer #2", position: 2>,
 #<Buyer id: 13, name: "Buyer #3", position: 3>,
 #<Buyer id: 14, name: "Buyer #4", position: 4>,
 #<Buyer id: 15, name: "Buyer #5", position: 5>,
 #<Buyer id: 16, name: "Buyer #6", position: 6>,
 #<Buyer id: 17, name: "Buyer #7", position: 7>,
 #<Buyer id: 18, name: "Buyer #8", position: 8>,
 #<Buyer id: 19, name: "Buyer #9", position: 9>,
 #<Buyer id: 20, name: "Buyer #10", position: 10>]
=> nil
>> pp Buyer.positioned_at_or_above(4)
[#<Buyer id: 14, name: "Buyer #4", position: 4>, #<Buyer id: 15, name: "Buyer #5", position: 5>, #<Buyer id: 16, name: "Buyer #6", position: 6>, #<Buyer id: 17, name: "Buyer #7", position: 7>, #<Buyer id: 18, name: "Buyer #8", position: 8>, #<Buyer id: 19, name: "Buyer #9", position: 9>, #<Buyer id: 20, name: "Buyer #10", position: 10>]
=> nil
>> pp Buyer.positioned_at_or_above(4).all
[#<Buyer id: 14, name: "Buyer #4", position: 4>,
 #<Buyer id: 15, name: "Buyer #5", position: 5>,
 #<Buyer id: 16, name: "Buyer #6", position: 6>,
 #<Buyer id: 17, name: "Buyer #7", position: 7>,
 #<Buyer id: 18, name: "Buyer #8", position: 8>,
 #<Buyer id: 19, name: "Buyer #9", position: 9>,
 #<Buyer id: 20, name: "Buyer #10", position: 10>]
=> nil
>> Buyer.increment(1000, 4)
=> [#<Buyer id: 14, name: "Buyer #4", position: 1004>, #<Buyer id: 15, name: "Buyer #5", position: 1005>, #<Buyer id: 16, name: "Buyer #6", position: 1006>, #<Buyer id: 17, name: "Buyer #7", position: 1007>, #<Buyer id: 18, name: "Buyer #8", position: 1008>, #<Buyer id: 19, name: "Buyer #9", position: 1009>, #<Buyer id: 20, name: "Buyer #10", position: 1010>]
>> pp Buyer.all
[#<Buyer id: 11, name: "Buyer #1", position: 1>,
 #<Buyer id: 12, name: "Buyer #2", position: 2>,
 #<Buyer id: 13, name: "Buyer #3", position: 3>,
 #<Buyer id: 14, name: "Buyer #4", position: 1004>,
 #<Buyer id: 15, name: "Buyer #5", position: 1005>,
 #<Buyer id: 16, name: "Buyer #6", position: 1006>,
 #<Buyer id: 17, name: "Buyer #7", position: 1007>,
 #<Buyer id: 18, name: "Buyer #8", position: 1008>,
 #<Buyer id: 19, name: "Buyer #9", position: 1009>,
 #<Buyer id: 20, name: "Buyer #10", position: 1010>]
=> nil
>> 
share|improve this answer
    
Great use of scopes. However, wouldn't your increment solution run into the N+1 queries problem as written? –  Sean Hill Jan 15 '11 at 14:32
1  
It would be better, to eliminate the N+1 queries, to do something like this: Buyer.positioned_at_or_above(position_threshold).update_all(["position = position + ?", amount]) –  Sean Hill Jan 15 '11 at 14:45
    
@Sean: great point. After reading your solution last night I made a version that looked like Buyer.positioned_at_or_above(position_threshold).update_all(["position = position + ?", amount]). The result was to set ALL positions to nil. Wow! At that point it was late so I punted. –  George Anderson Jan 15 '11 at 16:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.