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I am doing this in my Main Thread:

CCAnimation *anim; //class variable

[NSThread detachNewThreadSelector:@selector(loadAimation) toTarget:self withObject:nil];

In loadAimation:

-(void) loadAnimation {
    NSAutoreleasePool *autoreleasepool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
        anim = [[CCAnimaton alloc] init];
        [autoreleasepool drain];
}

And in main thread I release it:

        [anim release];

Now I want to ask if this is fine regarding memory management.

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Is loadAimation supposed to be loadAnimation? Why is anim a class variable rather than a property? What's the code around the release? There isn't quiet enough information to tell if the object creation and destruction is well balanced. –  outis Jan 15 '11 at 5:55
    
yes you are right I guess the problem is really whats happening around release, (I just wanted to ask if this is fine to do). Actually it's related to cocos2d before release I am making a CCAction and I have a CCSprite *sp, I am simply doing [sp runAction:anim]; while the animation is running I am releasing it, though nothing happens to the animation visually but is it right? –  Asymptote Jan 15 '11 at 6:03
    
It depends on how everything is implemented. Any object that takes ownership will retain the animation. If the object doesn't take ownership, it won't retain the animation. Check the cocos2d docs for ownership rules. Even so, you could still run into a race condition that causes memory management problems (e.g. the animation is released in one thread before the owning object can retain it in another thread). –  outis Jan 15 '11 at 6:13
    
No there were no race conditions in my program, got my problem solved though. The concept of this code is fine, but as you pointed out there must not be the race conditions. Thanks for replying btw. –  Asymptote Jan 17 '11 at 21:06

2 Answers 2

It's possible to allocate an object in one thread and deallocate it in another. However, depending on how you approach it, your code could do it incorrectly.

If possible, turn anim into a property so you don't have to worry so much about memory management. If you can't, you can apply the accessor pattern, but you have to implement it yourself.

static CCAnimation *anim=nil;

+(CCAnimation*)anim {
    @synchronized(self) {
        return [[anim retain] autorelease];
    }
}
+(void)setAnim:(CCAnimation*)animation {
    @synchronized(self) {
        if (anim != animation) {
            [anim release];
            anim = [animation retain];
        }
    }
}
-(void)loadAnimation {
    NSAutoreleasePool *autoreleasepool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
    [[self class] setAnim:[[[CCAnimaton alloc] init] autorelease]];
    [autoreleasepool drain];
}
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Don't @synchronize(self) to implement a standard setter/getter. Use an @property() and @synthesize. The result will be faster and guaranteed correct (not that the above is incorrect, but... why write code that the compiler can write for you?). –  bbum Jan 15 '11 at 18:39
    
@bbum: because these aren't your standard accessors, and anim isn't an (instance) property. Note the + before the methods. anim is a class property, which Apple's compiler won't generate for you (though it seems to support dot syntax for them). The @synchronize in the getter and setter are quite necessary when dealing with multithreading. –  outis Jan 15 '11 at 23:47
    
Derp. Yup -- sorry. Missed the +. Note that your return method is incorrect; if you want it to be properly atomic, it should return [[anim retain] autorelease]; to ensure that anim's lifespan in the local thread follows correct semantics (which, in fact, @synthesize will do w/standard accessors in the instance case). –  bbum Jan 16 '11 at 1:29
    
@bbum: is that to prevent a race condition between one thread using the stored object and another assigning to it? That is, thread A fetches the object, then thread B assigns to the property before A gets a chance to retain it. Thanks for the info. –  outis Jan 16 '11 at 9:50
    
Exactly. One of those very subtle race conditions. –  bbum Jan 16 '11 at 20:10

It should be ok, of course if you are protecting access to the pointer variable.

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