Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is the assignment and check for null explicitly required in the below snippet to achieve the same result. Also, is there anything wrong or can be improved here.

class Sample
{

private:
    char *bits;

public:

    Sample() 
    {
       bits = NULL; //should this be explicit?
    }


    ~Sample() 
    {
        if (bits != NULL) 
        {
           delete [] bits; //should this be explicit?
        }
        bits = NULL; //should this be explicit?
    }

};
share|improve this question
    
Don't forget the Rule of Three when writing classes like this. –  Fred Larson Jan 15 '11 at 6:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In the first case, where you do this in the constructor:

Sample()
{
    bits = NULL;
}

Whether or not you need this assignment depends on your code - if bits may not have any memory allocated to it at all, then the NULL assignment should be there because of the delete in the destructor. And really as a safety issue, you would probably want the NULL unless you document some contract the user has to obey, but here since you are initializing the pointer to NULL, I will assume that means bits could realistically be NULL or actually have new-allocated memory at some point.

If you did not initialize the pointer, and it is never subsequently made 'valid' by being assigned something, and the object is destroyed, then bad stuff happens.

Also, as a habit, prefer to use initialization lists when possible in constructors:

Sample() 
    : bits(NULL)
{

}

For the destructor, you do not need to check if a pointer is not NULL before deleting it. delete on a NULL pointer is completely safe. You also don't need to reassign the bits pointer back to NULL, the object is going away.

~Sample()
{
    delete [] bits;
}

Of course, if you delete an invalid pointer, then bad stuff will happen regardless.

share|improve this answer
    
ok. Aside, w.r.t the above code, are delete [] bits; and delete bits; equivalent? –  devnull Jan 15 '11 at 6:12
    
@iJeeves Use delete bits for a scalar, and delete [] bits for an array. What you have above is correct. –  chrisaycock Jan 15 '11 at 6:13
    
@iJeeves - sorry, edited my code because your original uses array delete, and not scalar. They are not the same thing and using the wrong form is undefined behavior. –  birryree Jan 15 '11 at 6:13
    
they are not equivalent. delete [] bits means delete an array of char, while delete bits means delete a single char. –  Viren Jan 15 '11 at 6:16
2  
general rule of thumb: if you use [] in new, use [] in delete –  Viren Jan 15 '11 at 6:16
class Sample
{

private:
    char *bits;

public:

    Sample() : bits(NULL) //always use member initialization list to init members
    {      
    }


    ~Sample() 
    {   
           delete [] bits; 
    }

};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.