Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a little scared to ask this for fear of retribution from the SO "You can't parse HTML with regular expressions" cult. Why does re.subn(r'<(script).*?</\1>', '', data, re.DOTALL) not strip the multiline 'script' but only the two single-line ones at the end, please?

Thanks, HC

>>> import re
>>> data = """\
<nothtml> 
  <head> 
    <title>Regular Expression HOWTO &mdash; Python v2.7.1 documentation</title> 
    <script type="text/javascript"> 
      var DOCUMENTATION_OPTIONS = {
        URL_ROOT:    '../',
        VERSION:     '2.7.1',
        COLLAPSE_MODINDEX: false,
        FILE_SUFFIX: '.html',
        HAS_SOURCE:  true
      };
    </script> 
    <script type="text/javascript" src="../_static/jquery.js"></script> 
    <script type="text/javascript" src="../_static/doctools.js"></script>
"""

>>> print (re.subn(r'<(script).*?</\1>', '', data, re.DOTALL)[0])
<nothtml> 
  <head> 
    <title>Regular Expression HOWTO &mdash; Python v2.7.1 documentation</title> 
    <script type="text/javascript"> 
      var DOCUMENTATION_OPTIONS = {
        URL_ROOT:    '../',
        VERSION:     '2.7.1',
        COLLAPSE_MODINDEX: false,
        FILE_SUFFIX: '.html',
        HAS_SOURCE:  true
      };
    </script> 
share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Leaving aside the question of whether this is a good idea in general, the problem with your example is that the fourth parameter to re.subn is count - there's no flags parameter in Python 2.6, although it was introduced as a fifth parameter in Python 2.7. Instead you can add `(?s) to the end of your regular expression for the same effect:

>>> print (re.subn(r'<(script).*?</\1>(?s)', '', data)[0])

<nothtml> 
  <head> 
    <title>Regular Expression HOWTO &mdash; Python v2.7.1 documentation</title> 




>>>

... or if you're using Python 2.7, this should work:

>>> print (re.subn(r'<(script).*?</\1>(?s)', '', 0, data)[0])

... i.e. inserting 0 as the count parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mark. I just don't get why one should parse the HTML for this bit of substitution. –  hcvst Jan 15 '11 at 7:06
    
@hc: I suppose it's somewhat debatable with a very simple example like this, particularly since we don't know the what context is of the larger problem that you're trying to solve. However, I've added an extra answer with some different approaches, since I think they're easier as well as safer. –  Mark Longair Jan 15 '11 at 8:16
    
@hc: Just found this. The reason people vote against regex is that there are so many creative ways to inject script tags that it's simply not worth trying to figure out the correct regexp. It's bound to be long and complex. –  bvukelic Feb 3 '11 at 0:19
    
Are you sure that the (?s) inline modifier must not be inserted before the dot? –  Casimir et Hippolyte Jan 21 at 13:43
    
@CasimiretHippolyte: it can come anywhere in the regular expression - the documentation says, "The group matches the empty string; the letters set the corresponding flags: [...], for the entire regular expression." (my emphasis) –  Mark Longair Jan 23 at 17:30
show 2 more comments

Just in case it's of interest, I thought I'd add an additional answer showing two ways of doing this with lxml, which I've found very nice for parsing HTML. (lxml is one of the alternatives that the author of BeautifulSoup suggests, in light of the problems with the most recent version of the latter library.)

The point of adding the first example is that it's really very simple and should be much more robust than using a regular expression to remove the tags. In addition, if you want to do any more complex processing of the document, or if the HTML you're parsing is malformed, you have a valid document tree that you can manipulate programmatically.

Remove all script tags

This example is based on the HTMLParser example from lxml's documentation:

from lxml import etree
from StringIO import StringIO

broken_html = '''
<html> 
  <head> 
    <title>Regular Expression HOWTO &mdash; Python v2.7.1 documentation</title> 
    <script type="text/javascript"> 
      var DOCUMENTATION_OPTIONS = {
        URL_ROOT:    '../',
        VERSION:     '2.7.1',
        COLLAPSE_MODINDEX: false,
        FILE_SUFFIX: '.html',
        HAS_SOURCE:  true
      };
    </script> 
    <script type="text/javascript" src="../_static/jquery.js"></script>
'''

parser = etree.HTMLParser()
tree = etree.parse(StringIO(broken_html), parser)

for s in tree.xpath('//script'):
    s.getparent().remove(s)

print etree.tostring(tree.getroot(), pretty_print=True)

That produces this output:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>Regular Expression HOWTO &#8212; Python v2.7.1 documentation</title>
  </head>
</html>

Use lxml's Cleaner module

On the other hand, since it looks as if you're trying to remove awkward tags like <script> perhaps the Cleaner module from lxml will also do other things you'd like:

from lxml.html.clean import Cleaner

broken_html = '''
<html> 
  <head> 
    <title>Regular Expression HOWTO &mdash; Python v2.7.1 documentation</title> 
    <script type="text/javascript"> 
      var DOCUMENTATION_OPTIONS = {
        URL_ROOT:    '../',
        VERSION:     '2.7.1',
        COLLAPSE_MODINDEX: false,
        FILE_SUFFIX: '.html',
        HAS_SOURCE:  true
      };
    </script> 
    <script type="text/javascript" src="../_static/jquery.js"></script>
'''

cleaner = Cleaner(page_structure=False)
print cleaner.clean_html(broken_html)

... which produces the output:

<html><head><title>Regular Expression HOWTO — Python v2.7.1 documentation</title></head></html>

(n.b. I've changed nothtml in your example to html - with your original, method 1 works fine, but wraps everything in <html><body>, but method 2 doesn't work for reasons I don't have time to figure out right now :))

share|improve this answer
add comment

The short answer, is don't do that. Use Beautiful Soup or elementree to get rid of them. Parse your data as HTML or XML. Regular expressions won't work and are the wrong answer to this problem.

share|improve this answer
    
This. Beautiful Soup is a lovely library. Makes scraping incredibly easy. –  Crowe T. Robot Jan 15 '11 at 6:43
    
Sorry, but this just amounts to another cult answer :) and does not address 'why'. Glancing at the Soup there are statements such as re.compile('(<[^<>]*)/>') Are they heretics, too? –  hcvst Jan 15 '11 at 6:55
    
the main reason for not using regular expression is nested tags. –  Berry Tsakala Jan 15 '11 at 9:15
    
@hc - It isn't a 'cult' answer. It's a true answer. The reason is nested tags, as someone pointed out. –  Omnifarious Jan 15 '11 at 18:43
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.