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I would like to do a set of operations (x y z) as long as I have at least 200MB free space on file-system mounted to /media/z.

How can I do that?

I tried something like

while (`df | grep /media/z | awk '{print $4}'` > 204800); do x; y; z; done;

but I guess my while syntax is wrong.

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1  
grep + awk is a useless use of grep, because awk can do all the job; in fact, you can write "awk '/\/media\/z/{print $4}' and get exactly the same result. –  marco Jan 15 '11 at 12:59
    
This will probably execute faster: df /media/z | awk 'NR==2{print $4}' –  Dennis Williamson Jan 15 '11 at 15:17

2 Answers 2

( ) executes a command in a sub-shell. If you want to test a condition you have to use test command: [ ].

while [ `df | grep /media/z | awk '{print $4}'` -gt 204800 ]; do 
    x; y; z; sleep 5; 
done;
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2  
that would be -gt rather that > (which is output redirection) –  falstro Jan 15 '11 at 9:51
1  
Also, in Bash, one can perform maths using <code>$(( 4 + 5))</code>. –  fredden Jan 15 '11 at 9:52
    
Opssssss. Roe, you are right! Thanks, I corrected it. –  andcoz Jan 15 '11 at 11:41
1  
@fredden: In comments, use backticks instead of <code> for code samples. –  Dennis Williamson Jan 15 '11 at 15:11

if you're using bash use [[ ]] to use the internal testing, it's faster and gives you standard operators:

while (( $(df /media/z | awk 'NR==2{print $4}') > 204800 )); do
    x; y; z
done
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+1 Plus, as you've shown, $() is preferable over backticks. –  Dennis Williamson Jan 15 '11 at 15:12
    
Use -gt for numeric comparison. > does string comparison (e.g. [[ 5 > 204800 ]] evaluates to true, but [[ 5 -gt 204800 ]] does not). –  Gordon Davisson Jan 15 '11 at 18:34
    
@Gordon You're right I should've used (( > )), fixed now, thanks. –  wich Jan 17 '11 at 9:42

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