Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a static variable in the class. I am Initializing that in the global scope, its works fine.

But When I try to Initialize in the main linker throws an error. Why it so.

class Myclass{

    static int iCount;
} ;

int main(){

  int Myclass::iCount=1;

}

And In global scope why I have to specify the variable type like

int Myclass::iCount=1;

As In my class I am definig iCount as integer type why not.

   Myclass::iCount =1 ; in //Global scope
share|improve this question
    
@goreSplatter: Myclass::iCount is not public, it would fail. –  peoro Jan 15 '11 at 10:32
    
@goreSplatter: What @peoro said, but also even if it were public, that would be an assignment not and initialisation –  Clifford Jan 15 '11 at 10:37
    
@peoro : initialization of private static data members don't fail!! other accesses, like assignment, will fail. –  Nawaz Jan 15 '11 at 11:03
    
@Nawaz: you didn't read the comment I was answering to. It was suggested to put a Myclass::iCount=1; in main. –  peoro Jan 15 '11 at 11:05
    
@peoro: you were talking about assignment or initialization? –  Nawaz Jan 15 '11 at 11:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The section $9.4.2/7 from the C++ Standard says,

Static data members are initialized and destroyed exactly like non-local objects (3.6.2, 3.6.3).

Note the phrases "initialized" and "exactly like non-local objects". Hope that explains why you cannot do that.

In fact, static members are more like global objects accessed through Myclass::iCount. So, you've to initialize them at global scope (the same scope at which class is defined), like this:

class Myclass{

    static int iCount;
} ;
int Myclass::iCount=1;

int main(){
  /*** use Myclass::iCount here ****/
}

Similar topic:

How do static member variables affect object size?

share|improve this answer

Because C++ syntax doesn't allow this. You need to instantiate your static variable outside of the scope of some function.

Besides you forget a semicolon ; after your class ending bracket.

share|improve this answer

this is the correct C++. Outside of a function, in a cpp file. the initialisation is done at the beginning/launching of the executable. ( even before calling main() );

//main.h

class Myclass{

    static int iCount;
}; // and don't forget this ";" after a class declaration


//main.cpp

int Myclass::iCount=1;

int main(){



}
share|improve this answer

From C++ standard (§8.5/10):

An initializer for a static member is in the scope of the member’s class.

class Myclass has global scope and you tried to initialize its static member in the narrower scope - of the function main.

share|improve this answer

The static initialisation occurs before main is called by the run-time initialisation.

Placing it within a function is not allowed because that is where locally scoped objects are declared. It would be confusing and ambiguous to allow that.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.