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I have a matrix which represents an image and I need to cycle over each pixel and for each one of those I have to compute the sum of all its neighbors, ie the pixels that belong to a window of radius rad centered on the pixel.

I came up with three alternatives:

  • The simplest way, the one that recomputes the window for each pixel
  • The more optimized way that uses a queue to store the sums of the window columns and cycling through the columns of the matrix updates this queue by adding a new element and removing the oldes
  • The even more optimized way that does not need to recompute the queue for each row but incrementally adjusts a previously saved one

I implemented them in c++ using a queue for the second method and a combination of deques for the third (I need to iterate through their elements without destructing them) and scored their times to see if there was an actual improvement. it appears that the third method is indeed faster.

Then I tried to port the code to Java (and I must admit that I'm not very comfortable with it). I used ArrayDeque for the second method and LinkedLists for the third resulting in the third being inefficient in time.

Here is the simplest method in C++ (I'm not posting the java version since it is almost identical):

void normalWindowing(int  mat[][MAX], int cols, int rows, int rad){
    int i, j;
    int h = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < rows; ++i)
    {
        for (j = 0; j < cols; j++) 
        {
            h = 0;
            for (int ry =- rad; ry <= rad; ry++) 
            {
                int y = i + ry;
                if (y >= 0 && y < rows) 
                {
                    for (int rx =- rad; rx <= rad; rx++) 
                    {
                        int x = j + rx;
                        if (x >= 0 && x < cols) 
                        {
                            h += mat[y][x];
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }   
}

Here is the second method (the one optimized through columns) in C++:

 void opt1Windowing(int  mat[][MAX], int cols, int rows, int rad){
    int i, j, h, y, col;
    queue<int>* q = NULL;
    for (i = 0; i < rows; ++i)
    {
        if (q != NULL)
            delete(q);
        q = new queue<int>();
        h = 0;
        for (int rx = 0; rx <= rad; rx++) 
        {
            if (rx < cols) 
            {
                int mem = 0;
                for (int ry =- rad; ry <= rad; ry++)
                {
                    y = i + ry;
                    if (y >= 0 && y < rows)
                    {
                        mem += mat[y][rx];
                    } 
                }
                q->push(mem);
                h += mem;
            }
        }
        for (j = 1; j < cols; j++) 
        {
            col = j + rad;
            if (j - rad > 0)
            {
                h -= q->front();
                q->pop();
            }
            if (j + rad < cols)
            {
                int mem = 0;
                for (int ry =- rad; ry <= rad; ry++)
                {
                    y = i + ry;
                    if (y >= 0 && y < rows)
                    {
                        mem += mat[y][col];
                    } 
                }
                q->push(mem);
                h += mem;
            }
        }
    }
}

And here is the Java version:

public static void opt1Windowing(int [][] mat, int rad){
    int i, j = 0, h, y, col;
    int cols = mat[0].length;
    int rows = mat.length;
    ArrayDeque<Integer> q = null;
    for (i = 0; i < rows; ++i)
    {
        q = new ArrayDeque<Integer>();
        h = 0;
        for (int rx = 0; rx <= rad; rx++)
        {
            if (rx < cols)
            {
                int mem = 0;
                for (int ry =- rad; ry <= rad; ry++)
                {
                    y = i + ry;
                    if (y >= 0 && y < rows)
                    {
                        mem += mat[y][rx];
                    }
                }
                q.addLast(mem);
                h += mem;
            }
        }
        j = 0;
        for (j = 1; j < cols; j++)
        {
            col = j + rad;
            if (j - rad > 0)
            {
                h -= q.peekFirst();
                q.pop();
            }
            if (j + rad < cols)
            {
                int mem = 0;
                for (int ry =- rad; ry <= rad; ry++)
                {
                    y = i + ry;
                    if (y >= 0 && y < rows)
                    {
                        mem += mat[y][col];
                    }
                }
                q.addLast(mem);
                h += mem;
            }
        }
    }
}

I recognize this post will be a wall of text. Here is the third method in C++:

void opt2Windowing(int  mat[][MAX], int cols, int rows, int rad){
    int i = 0;
    int j = 0;
    int h = 0;
    int hh = 0;
    deque< deque<int> *> * M = new deque< deque<int> *>();
    for (int ry = 0; ry <= rad; ry++)
    {
        if (ry < rows)
        {
            deque<int> * q = new deque<int>();
            M->push_back(q);
            for (int rx = 0; rx <= rad; rx++) 
            {
                if (rx < cols) 
                {
                    int val = mat[ry][rx];
                    q->push_back(val);
                    h += val;
                }
            }
        } 
    }
    deque<int> * C = new deque<int>(M->front()->size());
    deque<int> * Q = new deque<int>(M->front()->size());
    deque<int> * R = new deque<int>(M->size());

    deque< deque<int> *>::iterator mit;
    deque< deque<int> *>::iterator mstart = M->begin();
    deque< deque<int> *>::iterator mend = M->end();

    deque<int>::iterator rit;
    deque<int>::iterator rstart = R->begin();
    deque<int>::iterator rend = R->end();

    deque<int>::iterator cit;
    deque<int>::iterator cstart = C->begin();
    deque<int>::iterator cend = C->end();

    for (mit = mstart, rit = rstart; mit != mend, rit != rend; ++mit, ++rit)
    {
        deque<int>::iterator pit;
        deque<int>::iterator pstart = (* mit)->begin();
        deque<int>::iterator pend = (* mit)->end();
        for(cit = cstart, pit = pstart; cit != cend && pit != pend; ++cit, ++pit)
        {
            (* cit) += (* pit);
            (* rit) += (* pit);
        }
    }

    for (i = 0; i < rows; ++i)
    {        
        j = 0;
        if (i - rad > 0)
        {
            deque<int>::iterator cit;
            deque<int>::iterator cstart = C->begin();
            deque<int>::iterator cend = C->end();

            deque<int>::iterator pit;
            deque<int>::iterator pstart = (M->front())->begin();
            deque<int>::iterator pend = (M->front())->end();

            for(cit = cstart, pit = pstart; cit != cend; ++cit, ++pit)
            {
                (* cit) -= (* pit);
            }
            deque<int> * k = M->front();
            M->pop_front();
            delete k;
            h -= R->front();
            R->pop_front();
        }
        int row = i + rad;
        if (row < rows && i > 0)
        {
            deque<int> * newQ = new deque<int>();
            M->push_back(newQ);

            deque<int>::iterator cit;
            deque<int>::iterator cstart = C->begin();
            deque<int>::iterator cend = C->end();
            int rx;
            int tot = 0;
            for (rx = 0, cit = cstart; rx <= rad; rx++, ++cit) 
            {
                if (rx < cols) 
                {
                    int val = mat[row][rx];
                    newQ->push_back(val);  
                    (* cit) += val;
                    tot += val;
                }
            }
            R->push_back(tot);
            h += tot;
        }        
        hh = h;
        copy(C->begin(), C->end(), Q->begin());

        for (j = 1; j < cols; j++) 
        {
            int col = j + rad;
            if (j - rad > 0)
            {
                hh -= Q->front();
                Q->pop_front();
            }
            if (j + rad < cols)
            {
                int val = 0;
                for (int ry =- rad; ry <= rad; ry++)
                {
                    int y = i + ry;
                    if (y >= 0 && y < rows)
                    {
                        val += mat[y][col];
                    } 
                }
                hh += val;
                Q->push_back(val);   
            }
        }
    }
}

And finally its Java version:

public static void opt2Windowing(int [][] mat, int rad){
    int cols = mat[0].length;
    int rows = mat.length;
    int i = 0;
    int j = 0;
    int h = 0;
    int hh = 0;
    LinkedList<LinkedList<Integer>> M = new LinkedList<LinkedList<Integer>>();
    for (int ry = 0; ry <= rad; ry++)
    {
        if (ry < rows)
        {
            LinkedList<Integer> q = new LinkedList<Integer>();
            M.addLast(q);
            for (int rx = 0; rx <= rad; rx++)
            {
                if (rx < cols)
                {
                    int val = mat[ry][rx];
                    q.addLast(val);
                    h += val;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    int firstSize = M.getFirst().size();
    int mSize = M.size();
    LinkedList<Integer> C = new LinkedList<Integer>();
    LinkedList<Integer> Q = null;
    LinkedList<Integer> R = new LinkedList<Integer>();
    for (int k = 0; k < firstSize; k++)
    {
        C.add(0);
    }
    for (int k = 0; k < mSize; k++)
    {
        R.add(0);
    }

    ListIterator<LinkedList<Integer>> mit;
    ListIterator<Integer> rit;
    ListIterator<Integer> cit;
    ListIterator<Integer> pit;
    for (mit = M.listIterator(), rit = R.listIterator(); mit.hasNext();)
    {
        Integer r = rit.next();
        int rsum = 0;
        for (cit = C.listIterator(), pit = (mit.next()).listIterator();
            cit.hasNext();)
        {
            Integer c = cit.next();
            Integer p = pit.next();
            rsum += p;
            cit.set(c + p);

        }
        rit.set(r + rsum);
    }

    for (i = 0; i < rows; ++i)
    {
        j = 0;
        if (i - rad > 0)
        {
            for(cit = C.listIterator(), pit = M.getFirst().listIterator();
               cit.hasNext();)
            {
                Integer c = cit.next();
                Integer p = pit.next();
                cit.set(c - p);
            }
            M.removeFirst();
            h -= R.getFirst();
            R.removeFirst();
        }
        int row = i + rad;
        if (row < rows && i > 0)
        {
            LinkedList<Integer> newQ = new LinkedList<Integer>();
            M.addLast(newQ);
            int rx;
            int tot = 0;
            for (rx = 0, cit = C.listIterator(); rx <= rad; rx++)
            {
                if (rx < cols)
                {
                    Integer c = cit.next();
                    int val = mat[row][rx];
                    newQ.addLast(val);
                    cit.set(c + val);
                    tot += val;
                }
            }
            R.addLast(tot);
            h += tot;
        }
        hh = h;
        Q = new LinkedList<Integer>();
        Q.addAll(C);

        for (j = 1; j < cols; j++)
        {
            int col = j + rad;
            if (j - rad > 0)
            {
                hh -= Q.getFirst();
                Q.pop();
            }
            if (j + rad < cols)
            {
                int val = 0;
                for (int ry =- rad; ry <= rad; ry++)
                {
                    int y = i + ry;
                    if (y >= 0 && y < rows)
                    {
                        val += mat[y][col];
                    }
                }
                hh += val;
                Q.addLast(val);
            }
        }
    }
}

I guess that most is due to the poor choice of the LinkedList in Java and to the lack of an efficient (not shallow) copy method between two LinkedList.

How can I improve the third Java method? Am I doing some conceptual error? As always, any criticisms is welcome.

UPDATE Even if it does not solve the issue, using ArrayLists, as being suggested, instead of LinkedList improves the third method. The second one performs still better (but when the number of rows and columns of the matrix is lower than 300 and the window radius is small the first unoptimized method is the fastest in Java)

UPDATE2 Which tool can I use to profile my code and have a richer understanding of which instruction takes the most time? I'm on Mac OS X and using NetBeans Profiler just shows me that the three methods end up with different times (It seems I'm not able to scope within each method)

UPDATE3 I'm scoring the times in java using System.nanoTime() can this lead to inaccurate estimates?:

    long start, end;

    start = System.nanoTime();
    simpleWindowing(mat, rad);
    end = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println(end-start);

    start = System.nanoTime();
    opt1Windowing(mat, rad);
    end = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println(end-start);

    start = System.nanoTime();
    opt2Windowing(mat, rad);
    end = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println(end-start);
share|improve this question
    
Also, deque<> isn't too fast in C++ either. Use vector<> (with .reserve() to reduce memory allocations at construction.) –  Macke Jan 15 '11 at 12:29
    
Yes, you are probably right, but I do not need to optimize the C++ code more than that, I just wrote it first and then ported in Java which is the language I must use –  rano Jan 15 '11 at 12:39

4 Answers 4

LinkedList is a very bad choice for a list with where you do random access. For each get(int) scans the list until the request index is reached.
get(1) is quite fast, but get(100) is 100 times slower and get(1000) is a 1000 times slower than get(1)

You should change that to use ArrayList instead and initialize the ArrayList with the expected size to avoid unnecessary resizing of the internal Array.

Edit
While my coments about get() and LinkedList are correct, they do not apply in this context. I somehow overlooked that there is no random access to the list.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not using get in the code. I'm just using getFirst in some parts. I do not need random access, I just need direct access to the first and last element and to iterate through all of them. –  rano Jan 15 '11 at 12:37
    
Sorry, I thought I had seen random access to the lists, but apparently it's only the arrays you use that way. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 15 '11 at 13:05
    
Even changing to fixed size ArrayLists improves the code a bit against the simple first method but it still computes in more time than the second one. I guess because the ArrayDeque is optimized for removing items from the front whereas the ArrayList and the LinkedList no –  rano Jan 15 '11 at 13:19
    
I have to correct my last statement, the first method always performs better in java when the number of columns and rows is less than 300 and with small radiuses (4,5,6...), exceeding these values results in the second method to be the fastest –  rano Jan 15 '11 at 13:31

Use an int[] instead of a List.

Lists store Objects requiring a conversion from int to Integer and back.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not explain why the third method is slower than the second –  rano Jan 15 '11 at 17:38
    
It does, the third method caches more Integers. –  timon Jan 15 '11 at 19:51
    
I can see your point now, but still an int[] version will have to shift all the values when a value is removed from the front. I should use a very large array which length shall be the same as the number of columns/rows if I wanted to avoid the shifting –  rano Jan 16 '11 at 8:34
    
There's no need to shift anything, keep track of the start/end with int indices. The "very large array" will be no bigger than what ArrayList would use internally. –  timon Jan 16 '11 at 22:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I indeed implemented two optimized versions for that routine:

  • the first one, as User216237 suggested, makes use of an array of int as a queue to cache the summed column values as the algorithm scans the image by columns
  • the other one implements a Summed Area Table in order to compute every rectangualar area of sums by accessing this table just four times (It is independent from the window radius).

One technique can be arbitrary faster than the other according to the specific domain in which it is implemented. In mine, the summed area table had to be computed several times and so it resulted slower than the first method for a radius value lesser than 20 pixel.

share|improve this answer

About timing your code: System.nanoTime() is ok (i don't think you can get better since it's using OS timers as far as i know), but:

  • don't try to measure too short of a task, then the accuracy isnt so good. I think anything less than a few milliseconds will give you potential trouble. References, anyone?

  • measure multiple times, and take the median of the measurements. Outside effects can severely slow the execution, making your estimation useless. Taking the mean doesn't work too well because it is sensitive to such outliers.

  • many JVMs have JIT compiler, you may want to execute your code multiple times before you measure, so the compiler doesn't kick in somewhere in the middle of your measurement and half of your measurements are suddenly 10x faster than the rest. Better measure after your VM has "warmed up".

share|improve this answer

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