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I'm teaching myself Python. I saw a java permutation generator from a string, and I figured I use the java version and write the Python version myself.

Here is what I wrote in Python:

a = "abc"
a = list(a)

def swap(i,j):
    c = a[i]
    a[i] = a[j]
    a[j] = c

def perm2(n):
    if n == 1:
        print a

    else:
        for i in range(len(a)):
            swap(i, n-1)
            perm2(n-1)
            swap(i, n-1)

perm2(len(a))

When I run this, I get the following:

['b', 'c', 'a']
['c', 'b', 'a']
['c', 'a', 'b']
['c', 'a', 'b']
['a', 'c', 'b']
['a', 'b', 'c']
['b', 'a', 'c']
['a', 'b', 'c']
['a', 'c', 'b']

Now, the output does contain all the permutations, but it also contains duplicates. Yet the java version does not.

What is causing this issue?

Edit

By the way, I know I could research and find tools to do this for me in one line, etc...but my goal is to understand the cause of this issue so that the answer will hopefully help me in the future. Core understanding is important for me.

share|improve this question
    
You know you can use itertools.permutations for this… – Debilski Jan 15 '11 at 11:55
    
here is a more pythonistic swap: a[i],a[j] = a[j],a[i] – Adrien Plisson Jan 15 '11 at 11:57
1  
Yes, but I would like to understand the core of the language, as opposed to blindly using already existing tools. Trying to learn here, not develop software (yet) -- thanks though, I will keep that in mind :) – Sev Jan 15 '11 at 11:57
    
@Adrien - using your swap, same results, just FYI – Sev Jan 15 '11 at 11:59
    
@Sev: yes, it does not correct the problem (that's why i posted that as a comment). it was just to show you a python trick: it uses tuples to swap in-place instead of defining of function using a temporary variable. – Adrien Plisson Jan 15 '11 at 12:02
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Change len(a) with n :

def perm2(n):
    if n == 1:
        print a
    else:
        for i in range(n):  # << here
            swap(i, n-1) 
            perm2(n-1)
            swap(i, n-1)

Result :

['b', 'c', 'a']
['c', 'b', 'a']
['c', 'a', 'b']
['a', 'c', 'b']
['b', 'a', 'c']
['a', 'b', 'c']
share|improve this answer
    
ahhh there we go! silly mistake on my part. thanks! – Sev Jan 15 '11 at 12:10
    
@Sev: no problem, glad it help :) – mouad Jan 15 '11 at 12:13

I'd suggest you using the itertools

>>> import itertools
>>> for perm in itertools.permutations("abc"):
    print perm


('a', 'b', 'c')
('a', 'c', 'b')
('b', 'a', 'c')
('b', 'c', 'a')
('c', 'a', 'b')
('c', 'b', 'a')
share|improve this answer
    
-1: the OP clearly stated that he is trying to learn the language. – Adrien Plisson Jan 15 '11 at 12:03
    
I am sorry but, I think he edited his question after I posted the answer. – utku.zih Jan 15 '11 at 12:04
    
Although it wasn't very clearly stated in the question, it was in the comments, much before you posted :) anyway, thanks for the help! – Sev Jan 15 '11 at 12:17

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