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In the given code snippet, I expected the error symbol Record not found. But it compiled and ran fine on Visual Studio 2010 Compiler. I ran it as a C program from Visual Studio 2010 Command Prompt in the manner -

cl Record.c
Record

Now the doubt is, doesn't typedef check for symbols ? Does it work more like a forward declaration ?

#include "stdio.h"
#include "conio.h"

typedef struct Record R;
struct Record
{
    int a;
};

int main()
{   
    R obj = {10};
    getch();
    return 0;
}
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try to put typedef struct Record R; under struct Record ... –  xhan Jan 15 '11 at 15:40
    
@xhan - If I do it, it is a meaningful because symbol Record is found earlier. Thanks. –  Mahesh Jan 15 '11 at 15:42
    
Your code ran fine under GCC (had to change getch to getchar) and VS2005. I suspect your findings are right. –  karlphillip Jan 15 '11 at 15:43
    
possible duplicate of What's the syntactically proper way to declare a C struct? –  Jens Gustedt Jan 15 '11 at 16:10
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can always refer to undefined structures, which is a typical way to implement linked lists, after all. They just have to be defined when you want to make use of their fields. This page contains some details.

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C does not find the symbol Record because it is declared later on the code, like if you were trying to use a function you declare past on the code without defining its prototype.

You can also combine the two declarations, and then it becomes:

typedef struct Record
{
    int a;
} R;

It also works and, in my opinion, even better, not because it can be faster, but because it is smaller.

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smaller is typedef struct { int a; } R; –  user411313 Jan 15 '11 at 19:06
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typedef must be used after its first parameter has been defined.

struct Record
{
    int a;
};
typedef struct Record R;

or

typedef struct Record
{
    int a;
} R;

If you need to use struct Record within the struct, just use struct Record:

typedef struct Record
{
    struct Record *next;
}
typedef struct Record R;
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