Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I basically have an object, extended with a function through its prototype. Inside that function, another function exists, however when using this in this nested function, it does not seem to refer to the object, but the function.

For example,

var sampleObject = function() {
 this.foo = 123;
}

sampleObject.prototype.getFoo = function() {
 var nested = function() {
  return this.foo;
 }
 return nested();
}

var test = new sampleObject();

window.alert(test.getFoo()); // undefined

The this.foo does not refer to the 123 value, but is undefined as this refers to the nested function, in which no foo exists. How can I access the 123 value from the nested function?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
possible duplicate of In Javascript, why is the "this" operator inconsistent? –  Kirk Woll Jan 15 '11 at 17:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted
sampleObject.prototype.getFoo = function() {
 var me = this;
 var nested = function() {
  return me.foo;
 }
 return nested();
}

By saving the value of this in a local variable, you make it explicitly part of the lexical context for that function and for all nested function scopes. Thus, on the call to "nested", that inner function will have its own scope (it's own this value), but it can still refer to the variable "me" in the enclosing scope.

share|improve this answer
    
and what will happen if I do: var foo = new sampleObject(); $(window).on('scroll', foo.getFoo ); –  vsync Oct 25 '12 at 5:27
    
@vsync that should be fine - if you're having problems with something like that, I suggest that you open a whole new question with the code sample that's causing difficulty. –  Pointy Oct 25 '12 at 13:19
    
but that isn't fine, because by using a function reference we loose the this that is so vital to the prototyping, so var me = this; in your example will point to the window Object –  vsync Oct 25 '12 at 20:31
    
@vsync ah OK sorry I read your question incorrectly. Yes in that case you'd need to either wrap the call in an anonymous function or else use .bind() or something to do it for you. –  Pointy Oct 25 '12 at 20:40

The common work around for that is to use closure

sampleObject.prototype.getFoo = function() {
  var _this = this; 
  var nested = function() {
    return _this.foo;
   }
   return nested();
}

Some libraries add methods to automate this

share|improve this answer
    
I prefer the unautomated way as it's not that complex, thanks –  pimvdb Jan 15 '11 at 17:18
1  
You may prefer it in this situation, but the automated way is really nice for event handlers. –  Hemlock Jan 15 '11 at 17:20

This is a known wart on JavaScript. The usual pattern is to assign this to another variable (often self) in the outer function, then access self from the inner funtction. This works.

share|improve this answer

Apart from declaring it to var _this = this, I also see codes doing var that = this or var self = this.

Knowing your variable's scope is important as it might raises unexpected result.

share|improve this answer
    
if you are doing a large project come up with a convention. ie always use var that = this; or self or what ever –  Zachary K Jan 16 '11 at 8:50
    
For me, that is usually the variable in a prototype function, e.g. foo.prototype.add = function(that) {return this + that}, so I prefer self or me. –  pimvdb Jan 16 '11 at 11:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.