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If you recall, ten years ago C programming language had some advantages over Visual Basic and at that time C could DO things that Visual Basic could not.

Is this true when we compare C# vs. VB.NET? What can C# do that VB.NET can't?

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closed as not constructive by Fredou, Blaise Doughan, Henk Holterman, bmargulies, gnovice Jan 16 '11 at 7:36

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It's mostly just a syntactic preference. Personally, I prefer { and } over e.g. Begin Function and End Function. You can try it out in a converter, what looks better: developerfusion.com/tools/convert/vb-to-csharp –  Uwe Keim Jan 15 '11 at 17:29
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comparing C and VB is in no way the same... with vb.net and c# running on .Net they have the same runtime environment and get compiled into the same MSIL language so theoretically they can EXACTLY the same. Vb and C is totally different, vb had its own runtime environment while C was compiled to run on its own so comparing those two didn't make much sense. –  Pauli Østerø Jan 15 '11 at 17:34
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@Pauli: It's my belief, though anybody correct me if I'm wrong, that the compilers for the two mentioned .NET languages are still developed by different teams, at times resulting in much less preferred code being produced by the VB implementation. The most recent I have read about being a little old now, regarding verbose output for Linq queries. –  Grant Thomas Jan 15 '11 at 17:58
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@MAK make you deliver a relatively bugfree application in less time? –  Pauli Østerø Jan 15 '11 at 23:15
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Why is this question "impossible to objectively answer"? There are lists comparing the features of the two languages. I use VB and C# in one project/solution because of the (im)possibilities of each language. –  GvS Jan 20 '11 at 10:57

10 Answers 10

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Depends on what you mean by can't do. For example VB has XML literals but C# doesn't, but of course you can process XML in C#, just in a different way.

Ultimately I would say there is no problem that C# can solve which VB can't, the syntax and approaches are slightly different that's all.

Going forward there is a commitment from Microsoft to release future features for both languages at the same time, i.e. they won't go off developing specific features for just VB or C#. The syntax implementation of features will differ however, in line with their different syntactic flavours.

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+1 At the end of the day, this is the correct answer. –  Kyle Rozendo Jan 15 '11 at 17:34
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...except for Aliostad's answer. For almost every user, though, it comes down to a syntax/style preference. –  ClosureCowboy Jan 15 '11 at 21:45

VB.NET cannot do unsafe code and pointer operations.

For me this is the most fundamental difference as I sometimes have to do unsafe code for performance reasons.

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The Wikipedia page Features of Visual Basic .NET not found in C# summarizes the differences quite well.

Features of Visual Basic .NET not found in C#

  • Variables can be declared using the WithEvents construct. This construct is available so that a programmer may select an object from the Class Name drop-down list and then select a method from the Declarations drop-down list to have the Method signature automatically inserted
  • Auto-wireup of events, VB.NET has the Handles syntax for events
  • Marshalling an object for multiple actions using an unqualified dot reference. This is done using the With ... End With structure
  • IsNumeric evaluates whether a string can be cast into a numeric value (the equivalent for C# requires using int.TryParse)
  • XML Literals
  • Inline date declarations by using #1/1/2000# syntax (M/dd/yyyy).
  • Module (although C#'s sealed static classes with additional semantics, but each field has to individually be declared as static)
  • Members of Modules imported to the current file, can be access with no preceeding container accessor
  • The My namespace
  • Visual Studio's design-time experience is more responsive in the VB.NET language
  • COM components and interoperability is more powerful in VB.NET as the Object type is bound at runtime
  • Namespaces can be imported in project level, so they don't have to be imported to each individual file, like C#
  • Root namespace, in VB.NET projects, you can set the assembly root namespace which the whole project is wrapped with it, and you don't have to declare the namespace for each container.

Features of C# not found in Visual Basic .NET

  • Allows blocks of unsafe code (like C++/CLI) via the unsafe keyword.
  • Partial Interfaces
  • Iterators and the yield keyword
  • Multi-line comments (note that the Visual Studio IDE supports multi-line commenting for Visual Basic .NET)
  • Static classes (Classes which cannot contain any non-static members, although VB's Modules are essentially sealed static classes with additional semantics)
  • Can use checked and unchecked contexts for fine-grained control of overflow/underflow checking
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Interesting: Wikipedia misses something: Exception Filters are in VB but not C# (when clause on a catch) see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fk6t46tz.aspx –  Richard Jan 15 '11 at 18:21
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cool... i expect to see an update of the wikipedia article by the end of the day ;) hehe –  Pauli Østerø Jan 15 '11 at 18:24
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Incidentally, VB now supports Yeield/Iterators (I had to implement a custom Linq-To-Objects grouping this morning) –  Basic Jul 5 '12 at 14:09

VB.NET can't yield return to automatically implement an iterator:

public IEnumerable<Foo> GetFoos()
{
    yield return new Foo();
    yield return new Foo();
    yield return new Foo();
}

VB.NET can't lock:

lock(_syncRoot) 
{
    ...
}

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That could acutally be the only advantage of VB.NET ;-) –  Uwe Keim Jan 15 '11 at 17:30
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@Uwe, I doubt it :-) –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 15 '11 at 17:31
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But VB.NET can try-Monitor.Enter-finally. –  Jason Jan 15 '11 at 17:34
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@Darin Dimitrov: I think we're on the same page, I just don't want someone to think that lock has no equivalence in VB.NET. –  Jason Jan 15 '11 at 17:36
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@Jason, in fact it has: the SyncLock statement :-) –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 15 '11 at 17:37

VB.NET have no unsafe block and checked\unchecked block.

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One interesting difference is that VB doesn't support volatile keyword which is quite useful in parallel computations on multicore CPUs without locks. I tried hard to find any information on this and found nothing. (VB variables are either always volatile i.e. slower than C#, or always nonvolatile i.e. unsafe in multithreaded scenarios without locks.)

And, importantly! C++/CLR language is superior in some scenarios to both C# and VB. It has a bit strange syntax based on old C++ with pointers, but provides both C#-like generics, and real fully-featured C++ templates. It's the best for scientific computations which need to be fast etc. Also provides the possibility to easily combine managed and unmanaged variables in one piece of code, which is good for system-level programming.

edit: Another one difference is in try-catch blocks. C# selects the catch block just by datatype. In Visual Basic you can have a "filter" - it is a code executed before the catch block and if it returns false, the catch block is skipped. Obviously, you don't need this stuff often. Visual Basic and C# are very similar, and although there are some minor differences in their features, we usually can use both languages without problems.

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This is wrong. Yes, C# has volatile, but volatile has nothing to do with threading. It is strictly for interaction with unsafe code. .NET synchronization primitives should be used instead for both VB.NET and C#. –  Billy ONeal Jan 15 '11 at 23:40
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Billy ONeal, I am affraid you are wrong, not me. The volatile keyword affects multithreaded applications running on multiprocessor computers. And especially on alternative platforms like IA64 (Itanium2) it is very important. Example for(int i=0;i<10;i++) { .... } in this loop compiler can put i to CPU register to make the loop faster, so other CPUs never see any other value than 0 or 10 in i. If you define i as volatile, then other CPUs can see all values from 0 to 10 as the loop progresses. And on IA64, volatile has even more importance. –  Al Kepp Jan 16 '11 at 4:53

Different languages do things different ways. For example, F# is what's known as a "functional" language, but you basically do everything in F# that you can do in C#. It just does them in a different way.

Some languages make it easier to do certain kinds of programming. C# makes iterators easier. F# is easier to do mathematical programming. VB is easier for beginners.

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By default VB allows implicit conversions between types, while C# prohibits implicit conversions that lose precision. To turn off implicit conversions in VB, add Option Strict On to the top of each code file, or (in VS.NET) select Project, choose Properties, select compile, and select Option Strict On for the entire project.

' Add a Double and an Integer using the Object class Dim v1, v2 as Object

v1 = 10.125 v2 = 2005

Dim x as Integer = CType(v1, Integer) + CType(v2, Integer)

// Add a Double and an Integer using the Object class Object v1, v2;

v1 = 10.125; v2 = 2005;

int x = (int)v1 + (int)v2;

The last line in the code sample contains an error-the v1 value is cast to Int instead of a double. Unfortunately, the compiler won't catch the mistake. Instead, in C#, a run-time exception is thrown when the runtime attempts to cast a double to an Int value. In VB.NET, which allows narrowing conversions by default, the result is even worse-a miscalculation occurs.

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I copied this from a text book once but I forgot it's name ... –  CSharpenter Jan 15 '11 at 18:11

There are many good answers here about current situation, so I'll refer to something else. I don't see that there is something from VB that Microsoft cannot implement in C# and otherwise (code is managed by the same CLR). Actually, just one version ago, it was great advantage that VB could do Office automation much easier, but after the last version some things are implemented in C# and now they are equal concerning that.

So, in long term, syntax difference is most important. But at this point, unsafe code is probably most practical difference, as many pointed out here.

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Both C# and VB.NET get compiled into IL which is run on a just-in-time (JIT) compiler. There is nothing you can't do in VB.NET vs C#. You just might have to do it a little different. It runs the same in the end.

C is much different. C is compiled down to assembly code and will run much faster than VB, C# or VB.NET, but it can take much longer to write and test. VB, C#, and VB.NET allow you to write applications faster but with a little performance hit and using more memory.

So I think in the end C# and VB.NET becomes more of a preference thing though C# is much more popular and easier to find developers for.

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XML Literals is one thing you can do in VB.NET, while you can do the same thing it would be a very different way. –  kenny Jan 15 '11 at 17:46
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I agree but you can do XML just differently in C#. You could use a template engine of some sort to do the very same thing without hard coding it like you do with XML Literals. XML Literals is one of those nice Demo project things but not very useful in real applications. –  JTWebMan Jan 15 '11 at 17:59
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not supporting unsafe in vb.net is pretty fundamental, what is your workaround of that? –  Pauli Østerø Jan 15 '11 at 18:22
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You are kidding right you shouldn't be doing unsafe code in C# or VB.net. Write your unsafe code in C or C++ and then expose it with a API call that uses PInvoke. Now not to say there couldn't be a reason to do this but I am sure they are very small and not a reason to pick one over the other. –  JTWebMan Jan 15 '11 at 18:37
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And don't forget that you can't do exception filters in C# whereas you can in VB. This isn't just a case of requiring different syntaxes to do the same job (a la XML or Date literals): it's impossible to do exception filters in C#, just the same as it's impossible to do unsafe code in VB. –  LukeH Jan 15 '11 at 21:29

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