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I understand that semicolons indicate the end of a line in languages like Java, but why? I get asked this a lot by other people, and I can't really think of a good way to explain how it works better than just using line breaks or white space.

Sorry if this question seems rhetorical at all.

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Duplicate : stackoverflow.com/questions/10254588/… –  fastcodejava Mar 13 '13 at 0:06

4 Answers 4

They don't signal end of line, they signal end of statement.

There are some languages that don't require them, but those languages don't allow multiple statements on a single line or a single statement to span multipile lines (without some other signal like VB's _ signal).

Why do some languages allow multiple statements on a line? The philosophy is that whitespace is irrelevant (an end of line character is whitespace). This allows flexibility in how the code is formatted as formatting is not part of the semantic meaning.

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Ah, yes. I do know some languages that still allow multiple statements on one line, but by separating with a special character: statement1 | statement2 | statement 3, and I know some that allow one statement across multiple lines: statement 1/3 + statement 2/3 + statement 3/3 (comments don't allow multiple lines apparently, so just imagine this was 3 separate lines!) –  BlueThen Jan 15 '11 at 18:46
    
Well, you could make the semicolon optional and use it if you want to have multiple statements in one line. This is what JavaScript does. –  Tim Büthe Mar 26 '13 at 10:58

Many languages allow you to put as much spacing as you like. This allows you to be have control over how the code looks.

Consider:

 String result = "asdfsasdfs"
               + "asdfs"
               + "asdfsdf";

Because you are allowed to insert extra newlines you can split that line across several lines without problem. The language still needs to know the line is finished that is why you need a semicolon.

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JavaScript allows this with optional semicolons, so they are not needed per se –  Tim Büthe Mar 26 '13 at 11:00

Short answer:

Because everyone else does it.

In theory a language's statement is whatever the language designer is able to syntactically interpret when they parse your file. So if the language designer did not want to have semicolons they could have periods, dashes, spaces, newlines, or whatever to denote the separation of a statement.

Language designers often make the syntax easy to understand so that it can become popular.

Wikipedia: Semicolon Usage in Computer Languages

So if some language designer created a language that used ':-)' to denote the end of a statement it would, 1) be hard to read; 2) not be popular with people who already are used to using a ';'.

echo "Take Care" :-)

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I see how it'd be pretty to a typical programmer, but I feel like that's only because they're used to this design. Why would the very first programming language to use semicolons, use it? Is it easier for the compiler? –  BlueThen Jan 15 '11 at 18:52
    
Partially that, but JavaScript has optional semis which are nice because you CAN separate multiple statements one line if you want to. But it also produces some gotchas where not using one can lead to confusion with popular JS patterns like using parens around functions to evaluate and fire them immediately after definition. I actually enjoy white-space end-of-statements but it's never bothered me in JS where I tend to write after every line just to be explicit and avoid confusion for the next dev. It's an extra character here and there but we format in whatever fashion we like. That fits JS. –  Erik Reppen Jan 8 '13 at 0:24

The languages do it, as it signifies the end of a statement, not an end of the line, which means that you can compress code, to make it smaller and take up less space.

Take the C++ code (#include <iostream>):

for(int i = 0; i < 5; ++i){
    std::cout << "did you know?" << std::endl; 
    std::cout << "; signifies **end of statement**" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "**not the end of the line**" << std::endl;
}

It could also be written

for(int i = 0; i < 5; ++i){std::cout << "did you know?" << std::endl; std::cout << "; signifies **end of statement**" << std::endl; std::cout << "**not the end of the line**" << std::endl;}
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