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I am from C background and I just started learning python...

while trying some programs, I got this doubt...

how python evaluates the expression 1+++2?

No matter how many number of '+' I put in between, it is printing 3 as the answer. Please can anyone explain this behavior

and for 1--2 it is printing 3 and for 1---2 it is printing -1

please clear my doubt.

Regards

Sunil

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So does that mean there are no increment operators in python? –  udpsunil Jan 22 '09 at 17:52
2  
To increment a variable i in python: i += 1 –  Greg Hewgill Jan 22 '09 at 17:56
2  
-1: The question makes a huge number of assumptions about ++ and --; things which are answered directly in python.org/doc/2.5.2/ref/expressions.html –  S.Lott Jan 22 '09 at 23:12
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7 Answers

up vote 46 down vote accepted

Your expression is the same as:

1+(+(+2))

Any numeric expression can be preceded by - to make it negative, or + to do nothing (the option is present for symmetry). With negative signs:

1-(-(2)) = 1-(-2)
         = 1+2
         = 3

and

1-(-(-2)) = 1-(2)
          = -1

I see you clarified your question to say that you come from a C background. In Python, there are no increment operators like ++ and -- in C, which was probably the source of your confusion. To increment or decrement a variable i in Python use this style:

i += 1
j -= 1
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Btw: That was a design decision from the Python creators. It should exactly prohibit writing such indetermined code like i+++j. –  Boldewyn Jul 7 '09 at 8:17
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The extra +'s are not incrementors (like ++a or a++ in c++). They are just showing that the number is positive.

There is no such ++ operator. There is a unary + operator and a unary - operator though. The unary + operator has no effect on its argument. The unary - operator negates its operator or mulitplies it by -1.

+1

-> 1

++1

-> 1

This is the same as +(+(1))

   1+++2

-> 3 Because it's the same as 1 + (+(+(2))

Likewise you can do --1 to mean - (-1) which is +1.

  --1

-> 1

For completeness there is no * unary opeartor. So *1 is an error. But there is a ** operator which is power of, it takes 2 arguments.

 2**3

-> 8

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1+(+(+2)) = 3

1 - (-2) = 3

1 - (-(-2)) = -1

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Trying Unary Plus and Unary minus:

The unary - (minus) operator yields the negation of its numeric argument.

The unary + (plus) operator yields its numeric argument unchanged.

>>> +2
2
>>> ++2
2
>>> +++2
2
>>> -2
-2
>>> --2
2
>>> ---2
-2
>>> 1+(++2)
3
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but I am getting the result 3 for 1+++++++++++++2 also –  udpsunil Jan 22 '09 at 17:53
    
+1: Reference to the language reference –  S.Lott Jan 22 '09 at 23:14
    
No sweat: 1+(+(+(+(+(+(+(+(+(+(+(+(+2)))))))))))) 12 +'s are unary - see Greg Hewgill's reply. –  gimel Jan 23 '09 at 8:09
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I believe it's being parsed as, the first + as a binary operation (add), and the rest as unary operations (make positive).

 1 + (+(+2))
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It's simple. There are no post-incrementation or post-decrementation operators in Python.

See here: http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-list/2006-January/361771.html

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Think it as 1 + (+1*(+1*2))). The first + is operator and following plus signs are sign of second operand (= 2).

Just like 1---2 is same as 1 - -(-(2)) or 1- (-1*(-1*(2))

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