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I have 2 maps:

map<int, map<int, int> > m1;
map<int, map<int, int> > m2;

And want to fill them in with a function:

void fillMaps (m1, m2) {
    * m1[0][0] = 5;
    * m2[0][1] = 4;
}

How should i pass those maps to the function? I guess the variable itself can be passed just like this:

map<int, map<int, int> > m1;
map<int, map<int, int> > m2;

fillMaps(m1, m2);

But how should i define types of variables inside the function to be able to change values of the map?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

To change the maps in the function you'll want to pass them by reference:

void fillMaps (map<int, map<int, int> >& m1, map<int, map<int, int> >& m2) {
    m1[0][0] = 5;
    m2[0][1] = 4;
}

Note that there are spaces between the close angle braces to prevent weird compiler errors. Also note that with the pass by reference, you don't need to use any pointer dereferences; this is handled automatically.

share|improve this answer

You can pass the maps by reference or pointer to modify the values.

void fillMapsByReference (
    std::map<int, map<int, int> >& m1,
    std::map<int, map<int, int> >& m2)     {
    m1[0][0] = 5;
    m2[0][1] = 4;
}

void fillMapsByPointer (
    std::map<int, map<int, int> >* m1,
    std::map<int, map<int, int> >* m2)     {
    *m1[0][0] = 5;
    *m2[0][1] = 4;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I can't believe everybody chooses reference approach. In my opinion the pointer approach is strongly preferable because it is explicit. See Google C++ guide -- "all parameters passed by reference must be labeled const". – MK. Jan 15 '11 at 22:18

I'll provide a bit different answer from others. You can use C++ templates and make the compiler automatically infer the types for you:

template <typename T>
void fillMaps (T& m1, T& m2) {
    m1[0][0] = 5;
    m2[0][1] = 4;
}

Call it like this:

map<int, map<int, int> > m1;
map<int, map<int, int> > m2;

fillMaps(m1, m2);

This way you pass the maps by reference. Also, if you later change the type of the maps (for example using another map implementation or using strings instead of ints), you won't have to change this function.

share|improve this answer

Use typedef to make the code cleaner:

typedef map<int, map<int, int> > intmap;

void fillMaps(intmap &m1, intmap &m2)
{
     m1[0][0] = 5;
     m2[0][1] = 4;
}
share|improve this answer
    
See pointer arguments approach below by @Leonid. It is better, writable pass by reference is not a good style in my opinion. – MK. Jan 15 '11 at 22:19

Here is my approach:

template <typename T>
class MapOfMaps
{
  public:
    // ...

  private:
    map<T, map<T, T> > m;
};

typedef MapOfMaps<int> MapOfIntMap;

void fillmap(MapOfIntMap& m1, MapOfIntMap& m2)
{
//...
}
share|improve this answer

Pass the value by reference. Also, you need to declare the type of m1 and m2 in fillMaps.

void fillMaps(map<int, map<int,int> > &m1, map<int, map<int,int> > &m2)
{
     // fill map code in here
     m1[0][0] = 5;
     m2[0][1] = 4;
}

Then, to call use fillMaps(m1, m2);

share|improve this answer
    
Works in C++0x, but be careful that the code sample is not a valid C++ 2003 code - >> is illegal in template specifications. – Karel Petranek Jan 15 '11 at 20:08
    
fixed. Is that better? – helloworld922 Jan 15 '11 at 21:26

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