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Could someone please advise me how i could make this code more generic? I've tried a few ways but i'm struggling to replace the 'Integer' part of the code. The code has to pass a function in as a parameter to another function to increment a list of ints (but obviously if this was generic it'd be objects).

Thanks in advance

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Integer[] strArray = new Integer[]{1,2,3,4,5};

    List numbers = Arrays.asList(strArray);
    doFunc(numbers, new IFunction() { 
        public void execute(Object o) { 
           Integer anInt = (Integer) o; 
           anInt++;
           System.out.println(anInt);
        } 
    }); 
    for(int y =0; y<numbers.size();y++){
        System.out.println(numbers.get(y));
    }
}

public static void doFunc(List c, IFunction f) { 
   for (Object o : c) { 
      f.execute(o); 
   } 
}

public interface IFunction { 
    public void execute(Object o); 
}
share|improve this question
    
I for one cannot figure out what question you are asking here. 'Generic' meaning &lt; and &gt; or 'generic' meaning generalized? – bmargulies Jan 16 '11 at 0:12
    
How is this not a real question? – BoltClock Jan 16 '11 at 0:12
    
messr margulies should google/bing on "Java generics" before making the comment. – Blessed Geek Jan 16 '11 at 0:29
    
@ble I know perfectly well what a proper Java generic is. I just couldn't tell if the question was even asking about them. – bmargulies Jan 16 '11 at 2:27
    
Generics, with an "s". – Blessed Geek Jan 20 '11 at 3:21
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a version of your code that uses generics and avoids casts:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    Integer[] strArray = new Integer[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};

    List<Integer> numbers = Arrays.asList(strArray);
    doFunc(numbers, new IFunction<Integer>()
    {
        public void execute(Integer anInt)
        {
            anInt++;
            System.out.println(anInt);
        }
    });
    for (int y = 0; y < numbers.size(); y++)
    {
        System.out.println(numbers.get(y));
    }
}

public static <T> void doFunc(List<T> c, IFunction<T> f)
{
    for (T o : c)
    {
        f.execute(o);
    }
}

public interface IFunction<T>
{
    public void execute(T o);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks, so do i take it that i cant avoid the 'Integer' type declared in the definition of public void execute? – Jason Jan 16 '11 at 0:28
    
I suppose you could declare it as Number instead and then use System.out.println(aNumber.intValue() + 1). – Martin Jan 16 '11 at 0:38
1  
@Jason - if you're referring to using generics of the form <T extends Number> T doFn(T t) {return t + 1;} then no, that is not possible in Java. – McDowell Jan 16 '11 at 0:39

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