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I'm trying to implement an interface that requires a single property, but I don't explicitly care what type it is. For example:

public interface IName
{
    dynamic Name {get; set;}
}

Then if I have a class I'd like to implement the IName interface with a type of string:

public class Person : IName
{
     public string Name {get; set;}
} 

This however raises an error. I know I could make the interface IName take a generic arguement IName<T> but that forces me to create a bunch of overloaded functions that take IName<string>, IName<NameObj>, IName<etc> instead of casting within a single function.

How can I require that a class contains a property?

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Does the return type really need to be "any object"? What will the consuming code look like, and how will it deal with literally any object being returned? The only things you'll really know exist are methods on Object, and if you're going to use those, you might as well make the return type Object. I guess if this is throw-away or internal code that you plan to reuse very little, then it might be okay. Beyond this, I suggest taking advantage of the type system. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jan 16 '11 at 8:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I am unable to test this now, but maybe you could implement the interface explicitly.

public class Person : IName
{
    public string Name {get; set;}

    dynamic IName.Name {
        get { return this.Name; }
        set { this.Name = value as string; }
    }
} 
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1  
Well Played. This totally works. Never would of thought of this. –  James Jan 16 '11 at 16:59

Returning a dynamic allows you to return any type you please. Simply declare the type in your implementing class to be dynamic.

    public interface IName
    {
        dynamic name { get; set; }
    }

    public class Person: IName
    {
        private string _name;
        public dynamic name { get { return _name; } set { _name = value;} }
    }

edit:

note that you'll have to be careful about what you pass to name since the type of value will only be checked at runtime (the joys of using dynamic types).

Person p = new Person();
p.name = "me"; // compiles and runs fine, "me" is a string
p.name = p; // compiles fine, but will run into problems at runtime because p is not a string
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Make

public string Name {get; set;}

and make the return type Object.

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Nope: 'Person' does not implement interface member 'IName.Name'. 'Person.Name' cannot implement 'IName.Name' because it does not have the matching return type of 'dynamic'. My code in the question was wrong though. Good catch and updated. –  James Jan 16 '11 at 7:17
interface IName<T>
{
    T Name { get; set; }
}

class Person : IName<string>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Best way to do this. dynamics should be best avoided, unless you are totaly sure what are you doing. And in many cases, you are not. –  Euphoric Jan 16 '11 at 8:59

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