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In a If Statement When should I use =, == operators. Is there a === operator ? What is the difference between these operators ?

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4  
What book are you using to learn C#? This should be covered in the first chapter or two. –  Greg Hewgill Jan 16 '11 at 8:05
    
Sorry cant tell you the name of the book , it would be like offending the author :). Its Sad some examples are not explained well in this book :( –  subanki Jan 16 '11 at 8:10
3  
@subanki: If you regard the book that poorly, get a different one. What's the point of wasting your time trying to learn a language from a book that even you agree is so bad it would embarrass the author? See this question, and this other question for some recommendations. –  Cody Gray Jan 16 '11 at 8:14
    
@Cody The book is very simple and easy to understand but some few examples are not explained well . Besides I just bought this book 2 days ago. –  subanki Jan 16 '11 at 8:20
    
@subanki: That's good: it means you haven't wasted very much time on the book already. If the simple examples are poorly explained, what can you possibly expect for the more complicated stuff? I suspect it will just get much worse. There are other simple books that are easy to understand—the questions I linked to suggest books for a new programmer, not experts. –  Cody Gray Jan 16 '11 at 8:24

10 Answers 10

up vote 11 down vote accepted

= is assignment, like in

var i = 5;

Do not use this operator in the if statement.

== is for comparison like in

if(i == 6){...}

there is no === operator in C#

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So if I use it like this ......... if (i = 5) {x=10;} ...... in this case the i is being assigned the value 5 ? –  subanki Jan 16 '11 at 8:14
2  
C# is smart enough to warn you when you try to compile that code. it should be if (i == 5) {x = 10;} EDIT: Clarifications –  tenor Jan 16 '11 at 8:16
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No warning just a error, i=5 will be evaluated, i will be assigned the value 5 and return 5, as 5 is not a boolean (true/false) the if statement is illegal and you will get a compilation error. –  Viktor Jan 16 '11 at 8:25
1  
C# won't compile it, because i = 6 does not evaluate to a boolean expression. Even if it did, assigning a variable inside an if condition block is bad style and should be avoided. –  tenor Jan 16 '11 at 8:27
1  
+1, @Viktor that's right a compilation error will show and the program won't execute. –  A_Nablsi Jan 16 '11 at 8:30

(The following is somewhat of a "comment" but is too long to be in a comment and would be lost with the other comments in this post.)

In C# == (like all operators in C#) is non-polymorphic. That is, the "version" of == that is called is always based on the static type at compile-time.

For instance:

object a = Guid.NewGuid();
object b = new Guid(""+a);
a == b // false -- uses object.== -- an *identity* compare

The Equals virtual method, on the other hand, is defined on object and is thus polymorphic across all sub-types.

object a = Guid.NewGuid();
object b = new Guid(""+a);
a.Equals(b) // true -- uses Guid.Equals

The choice of which one to use (== or Equals) is sometimes subtle -- but important. Most collection types will use Equals for tasks like Contains, etc. (This is pretty much required for all generic containers as there is no T.== for an arbitrary type T.)

// compile-time error: Operator '==' cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T'
bool equals<T> (T a, T b) { return a == b; }

// fair-game, because object defines Equals and it's polymorphic to subtypes
bool equals<T> (T a, T b) { return a.Equals(b); }

See When should I use == and when should I use Equals? and Guidelines for Implementing Equals and the Equality Operator (==), etc. Personally, I use == over Equals for statically-resolvable concrete types for which == is well-defined and I will not (by contract or convention) deal with a subtype -- examples are string and (most) structure types (e.g. int, Guid).

Happy coding.

Edit: There is no C# === operator (as people have said, duh!). If talking about the JavaScript variant, it would be approximately:

bool trippleEquals (object a, object b) {
  return a.GetType() == b.GetType() && a.Equals(b);
}

(It is strict equality in JavaScript -- but not object identity).

If talking about object identity then it should be the same as (object)a == (object)b which has the same semantics as object.ReferenceEquals(a,b).

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+1 for showing the difference between strict equality and object identity. –  comecme Jan 16 '11 at 11:47
    
nice, thorough answer –  cori May 11 '11 at 14:57

a single = is for assignment like:

String myString = "Hi There";

A double equal is for comparison

if (5 == 5)
{
    do something
}

triple equals in some languages mean exactly equal.

C# does not utilize that operator.

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There is no === in C#. –  Al Kepp Jan 16 '11 at 8:10

In if statement you usually check for equality using ==, the = operator is the assignemt operator, and for my knowledge there is no === in c# I have never heard of it but it does exists in other languages I think in javascript it does.

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In addition to the other answers, ReferenceEquals(x,y) is probably the closest thing to ===.

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One equal sign is only used to assign a variable a value, the assignment will also return the same value so i could be used in a if statement but should never (almost...) be used in a if statement. Double equal signs are used to test if two values are equal and is what you use most of the time. I don't know of a === operator.

/Viktor

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= is an assignment operator while
==is an comparision operator

Example:

int a=2;
int b=3;    
int c=a=b; // a, b, c is equal to 3 as b=3

while

int a=2;
int b=3;

bool c= a==b // c = false since result of a==b is false
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For extra info, the Not Equal operator is !=.

More info on C# Operators: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6a71f45d%28v=VS.100%29.aspx

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I came across === only in javascript yet. It's the strict equal operator in there. I used it several times as this if(obj === undefined){ alert("obj has sublimed");}

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This is to long for a comment so I decided to add another post.

I set var variables to an object list this and performed a comparison on the two vars that always failed comparison logic:

   object Object1;
   object Object2;  
   var v1 = Object1;
   var v2 = Object2;
   if (v1 != v2)
   {
     // Do something
   }

Thanks to the posts here in this thread, I changed the logic as follows and now it works perfectly:

   object Object1;
   object Object2;  
   var v1 = Object1;
   var v2 = Object2;
   if (!v1.Equals(v2))
   {
     // Do something
   }
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