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I think there is a problem in php's OOP implementation.

EDIT: Consider more illustrative example:

abstract class Animal {

    public $name;

    // public function Communicate(Animal $partner) {}     // Works
    public abstract function Communicate(Animal $partner); // Gives error
}

class Panda extends Animal {

    public function Communicate(Panda $partner) {
        echo "Hi {$partner->name} I'm a Panda";
    }

}

class Human extends Animal {

    public function Communicate(Human $partner) {
        echo "Hi {$partner->name} I'm a Human";
    }

}

$john = new Human(); $john->name = 'John';
$mary = new Human(); $mary->name = 'Mary';
$john->Communicate($mary); // should be ok

$zuzi = new Panda(); $zuzi->name = 'Zuzi';
$zuzi->Communicate($john); // should give error

The problem is that when Animal::Communicate is an abstract method, php tells that the following methods are illegal:

"public function Communicate(Panda $partner)" "public function Communicate(Human $partner)"

but when Animal::Communicate is non-abstract but has zero-implementation Php thinks that these methods are legal. So in my opinion it's not right because we are doing override in both cases, and these both cases are equal, so it seems like it's a bug...

Older part of the post:

Please consider the following code:

Framework.php

namespace A
{
    class Component { ... }

    abstract class Decorator {
        public abstract function Decorate(\A\Component $component);
    }
}

Implementation.php

namespace B
{
    class MyComponent extends \A\Component { ... }
}

MyDecorator.php

namespace A
{
    class MyDecorator extends Decorator {
        public function Decorate(\B\MyComponent $component) { ... }
    }
}

The following code gives error in MyDecorator.php telling

Fatal error: Declaration of MyDecorator::Decorate() must be compatible with that of A\Decorator::Decorate() in MyDecorator.php on line ...

But when I change the Framework.php::Decorator class to the following implementation:

    abstract class Decorator {
        public function Decorate(\A\Component $component) {}
    }

the problem disappears.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

See http://bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=36601, this issues has been reported as a bug but was rejected because of laziness :D

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The problem is that type hints allow specialization in general, but not allow it when the method is abstract, so I suspect that actually they have implemented this functionality since 2006 but forgot something and it bugs when the method is abstract –  Lu4 Jan 16 '11 at 10:57

I'm not sure (haven't tested it ;), but you declare this abstract function:

public abstract function Decorate(\A\Component $component);

So you should implement this EXACTLY like that. But you did this:

public function Decorate(\B\MyComponent $component) { ... }

That's not the same. Could you try to change that to \A\Component?

To all comments: fact of the matter is that this piece of PHP "runs"

namespace A
{
    class Component { }

    abstract class Decorator {
        public abstract function Decorate(\A\Component $component);
    }
}
namespace B
{
    class MyComponent extends \A\Component { }
}
namespace A
{
    class MyDecorator extends Decorator {
        public function Decorate(\A\Component $component) {}
    }

}

And this doesn't:

<?php
namespace A
{
    class Component { }

    abstract class Decorator {
        public abstract function Decorate(\A\Component $component);
    }
}
namespace B
{
    class MyComponent extends \A\Component { }
}
namespace A
{
    class MyDecorator extends Decorator {
        public function Decorate(\B\MyComponent $component) {}
    }

}
?>

With this error: PHP Fatal error: Declaration of A\MyDecorator::Decorate() must be compatible with that of A\Decorator::Decorate() in line 18

Now you can discuss all you like about how that should or should not be, but that's the problem with the code.

so, to satisfy my own curiosity: this is illegal too:

<?php
    class Component { }

    abstract class Decorator {
        public abstract function Decorate(Component $component);
    }

    class MyComponent extends Component { }
    class MyDecorator extends Decorator {
        public function Decorate(MyComponent $component) {}
    }


?>

It's not the namespaces or anything. It just doesn't seem legal.

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2  
This pattern restricts types to more specific ones, it shouldn't be a problem because \B\MyComponent extends \A\Component and this means that \B\MyComponent is the \A\Component in the first place –  Lu4 Jan 16 '11 at 9:04
1  
But your abstract makes you define a function that accepts ALL \A\Component arguments, and your implementation only accepts \B\MyComponent. This means that you have not implemented the function that is 'demanded' by the super. –  Nanne Jan 16 '11 at 9:07
    
Nope, Lu4 is right, because a more specific class has to be a subtype and fulfill all requirements that exist for its superclass. It's called Liskow's substitution principle and is and fundamental rule of OOP... –  Paul Jan 16 '11 at 9:49
    
Maybe it's the namespace, maybe your liskow's substitution principle isn't followd in PHP, but it is still the reason why it doesn't work. see example-edits in my answer. –  Nanne Jan 16 '11 at 9:57
    
nope, not the namespace. –  Nanne Jan 16 '11 at 10:00

It has nothing to do with it being abstract. It has to do with the type hinting. The two definitions of the method are not compatible because you explicitly set the argument to be of type \A\Component and then try to overload the method with \B\Component you cant do that because it changes the method signature. Any subsequent declaration of Decorate must use the same type hint as its parent declaration in order for the method signatures to be compatible.

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1  
Yes but, \B\Component extends \A\Component, and this means that the signatures are equal in terms of OOP, any way this thing is working when the method has zero-implementation, and when I mark it as abstract and remove zero-implementation, it tells that the methods are not compatible. I don't think that implementation of method is a subject of method signature compatability –  Lu4 Jan 16 '11 at 9:11
2  
actually it is a subject they messed up in PHP (like many others)... strictly speaking, type hinting with subtypes would have to be possible in an OO language (which PHP in fact is only since a reasonable amount of time)... –  Paul Jan 16 '11 at 10:16
    
Totally agree with you :) –  Lu4 Jan 16 '11 at 10:57

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