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Coluld you provide a simple code example? (sorry C++ nube) and how to call a function from the class you are extending?

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Could you be more specific about what you want to achieve ? Do you want to overload a method and call the parent version of the method or just call an inherited method ? –  ereOn Jan 16 '11 at 11:06
    
Please clarify your question. What are you trying to achieve? Do you have a specification you have to fulfull? Please copy-paste it. Be as specific as possible, so others can understand your problem, so they get the possibility to give you a meaningful answer. –  pts Jan 16 '11 at 11:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A bit useful example: :-)

class CImplementation
{
public:
void doFoo();
};

void CImplementation::doFoo()
{
//implementation
}

class IInterface
{
public:
virtual void foo()=0;
};

class DerivedFromImplementationAndInterface : public CImplementation, public IInterface
{
virtual void foo();
};

void DerivedFromImplementationAndInterface::foo()
{
doFoo();
}


//possible usage:
void method(IInterface& aInterface)
{
aInterface.foo();
}

void test()
{
IInterface* d = new DerivedFromImplementationAndInterface;
method(*d);
}
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In C++, you can extend multiple classes, it's called multiple inheritance. Most probably this is what you're looking for. Please read a good book about multiple inheritance and C++ (a quick introduction: http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/comphelp/v8v101/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.xlcpp8a.doc%2Flanguage%2Fref%2Fcplr134.htm), because there are many pitfalls and details to pay attention to.

Example for multiple inheritance:

class A { ... };
class B { ... };
class C: public A, public B {};  // C inherits from A and B.
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I believe this is the simplest answer. I join @pts in recommending reading a good book (or webpage) about the pitfalls of multiple inheritance before using them. If you "must" use multiple inheritance, then recommend having one base class, and the other as interfaces only (i.e. doesn't have any member variables). –  Rafid Jan 16 '11 at 11:08

C++ doesn't explicitly have interfaces, the equivalent of an interface in Java is usually implemented with a class having only pure virtual functions (plus constructors, destructor, copy assignment):

#include <iostream>

// interface
class Fooable {
  public:
    virtual int foo() = 0;
    virtual ~Fooable() {}
};

// base class
class Base {
  public:
    void non_virtual_function() { std::cout << "Base::non_virtual_function\n"; }
    virtual void virtual_function() { std::cout << "Base::virtual_function\n"; }
};

// derived class, inherits from both Base "class" and Fooable "interface"
class Derived: public Base, public Fooable {
  public:
    virtual int foo() {
      // call base class function
      Base::non_virtual_function();
      // virtual call to function defined in base class, overridden here
      virtual_function();
    }
    virtual void virtual_function() {
        // call base class implementation of virtual function directly (rare)
        Base::virtual_function();
        std::cout << "Derived::virtual_function\n";
    }
    void non_virtual_function() {
        // not called
        std::cout << "Derived::non_virtual_function\n";
    }
};

int main() {
    Derived d;
    d.foo();
}
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Not sure what you're asking:

class A
{
  public:
    void method();
};

class B
{
  public:
    void method();
};

class C : public A, public B
{
  public:
    void callingMethod();
};

void C::callingMethod()
{
  // Here you can just call A::method() or B::method() directly.
  A::method();
  B::method();
}

Note that multiple inheritance can lead to really hard-to-solve problems and I would recommend to only use it when necessary.

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and how about implementations? sorry ment interfaces. –  Rella Jan 16 '11 at 11:06
1  
There is no such things as interfaces in C++. You can however have multiple inheritance but one usually has to be really careful about it. –  ereOn Jan 16 '11 at 11:09

The question as stated,

C++ is it possible to make a class extend one class and implement another?

does not make much sense. The answer to that is just "yes". You can derive from any number of classes: C++ fully support multiple inheritance.

So, given that the question as stated isn't really meaningful, it's at least possible that you meant to ask

C++ is it possible to make a class extend one class and thereby implement another?

The answer to this question is also yes, but it's not trivial. It involves virtual inheritance. Which is quite tricky.

Here's an example:

#include <iostream>

void say( char const s[] ) { std::cout << s << std::endl; }

class TalkerInterface
{
public:
    virtual void saySomething() const = 0;
};

class TalkerImpl
    : public virtual TalkerInterface
{
public:
    void saySomething() const
    {
        say( "TalkerImpl!" );
    }
};

class MyAbstractClass
    : public virtual TalkerInterface
{
public:
    void foo() const { saySomething(); }
};

class MyClass
    : public MyAbstractClass
    , public TalkerImpl
{};

int main()
{
    MyClass().foo();
}

The virtual inheritance ensures that there is only one sub-object of type TalkerInterface in a MyClass instance. This has some counter-intuitive consequences. One is that "inheriting in an implementation" works, and another is that construction of that base class sub-object happens down in each MyClass constructor, and more generally down in the most derived class.

Cheers & hth.,

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