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I would like to throw exceptions with meaningful explanation (socket handle, process id, network interface index, ...) ! I thought of using variable arguments worked fine but lately I figured out it's impossible to extend the class in order to implement other exception types. So I figured out using an std::ostreamstring as a an internal buffer to deal with formatting ... but doesn't compile! I guess it has something to deal with copy constructors. Anyhow here is my piece of code:

  class Exception: public std::exception {
public:
  Exception(const char *fmt, ...);
  Exception(const char *fname,
            const char *funcname, int line, const char *fmt, ...);
  //std::ostringstream &Get() { return os_ ; }
  ~Exception() throw();
  virtual const char *what() const throw();

protected: char err_msg_[ERRBUFSIZ]; //std::ostringstream os_; };

The variable argumens constructor can't be inherited from! this is why I thought of std::ostringstream! Any advice on how to implement such approach ?

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Define meaningful explanation. –  Puppy Jan 16 '11 at 12:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is a bit awkward to pass ... arguments, but possible. You need first to convert them to va_list. So, for your derived class to be able to pass the format and the arguments to its base class something like the following can be done:

class Exception: public std::exception {
public:
  Exception(const char *fmt, ...)
  {
    va_list ap;
    va_start(ap, fmt);
    this->init(fmt, ap);
    va_end(ap);
  }

  virtual const char *what() const throw();

protected:
  Exception(); // for use from derived class's ctor

  void init(char const* fmt, va_list, ap)
  {
    vsnprintf(err_msg_, sizeof err_msg_, fmt, ap);
  }

  char err_msg_[ERRBUFSIZ];
};

struct Exception2 : Exception
{
  Exception2(const char *fmt, ...)
  {
    va_list ap;
    va_start(ap, fmt);
    this->init(fmt, ap);
    va_end(ap);
  }
};
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Yes I've been using the same approach but it reveals to be somehow painful to derive and implement :) –  ZeroCool Jan 16 '11 at 13:39

I presume you mean the problem is that ostringstream isn't copy constructible. If I understand correctly, how about making ostringstream member be a pointer like std/boost::shared_ptr? For example:

#include <exception>
#include <sstream>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
#include <boost/make_shared.hpp>

struct E : std::exception {
  boost::shared_ptr< std::ostringstream > os_;
  mutable std::string s_;
  std::ostringstream &Get() { return *os_; } 
  const char *what() const throw() {
    s_ = os_->str();
    return s_.c_str();
  }
  E() : os_( boost::make_shared< std::ostringstream >() ) {}
  ~E() throw() {}
};

int main()
{
  try {
    E e;
    e.Get() << "x";
    throw e;
  }
  catch ( std::exception const& e ) {
    cout<< e.what() <<endl;
  }
}

Hope this helps.

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Usually, the best solution is to define dedicated exception types for different exceptions. Your SocketException type would accept a socket handle, etcetera. This eliminates the need for a vararg ... argument in the ctor.

Also, you wouldn't need a std::ostringstream os_ member. An ostringstream object is commonly used to format text, but not to store the result. For that purpose, use an ordinary std::string.

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