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Is there a way to make an Oracle query behave like it contains a MySQL limit clause?

In MySQL, I can do this:

select * 
from sometable
order by name
limit 20,10

to get the 21st to the 30th rows (skip the first 20, give the next 10). The rows are selected after the order by, so it really starts on the 20th name alphabetically.

In Oracle, the only thing people mention is the rownum pseudo-column, but it is evaluated before order by, which means this:

select * 
from sometable
where rownum <= 10
order by name

will return a random set of ten rows ordered by name, which is not usually what I want. It also doesn't allow for specifying an offset.

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111  
It's a real shame Oracle doesn't have some syntactic sugar to make this common requirement simple. –  WW. Jan 22 '09 at 21:46
27  
I guess it's a shame that ANSI SQL doesn't either :) –  Dave Costa Jan 23 '09 at 16:54
6  
Standardized in SQL:2008. –  dalle Jan 26 '09 at 14:18
6  
Limit was announced by Tom Kyte for Oracle 12c... –  wolφi Dec 3 '12 at 11:44
9  
Fetching the next page in a result set? –  Mathieu Longtin Dec 16 '13 at 16:33

12 Answers 12

up vote 398 down vote accepted

You can use a subquery for this like

select *
from  
( select * 
  from emp 
  order by sal desc ) 
where ROWNUM <= 5;

Have also a look at the topic On ROWNUM and limiting results at Oracle/AskTom for more information.

Update: To limit the result with both lower and upper bounds things get a bit more bloated with

select * from 
( select a.*, ROWNUM rnum from 
  ( <your_query_goes_here, with order by> ) a 
  where ROWNUM <= :MAX_ROW_TO_FETCH )
where rnum  >= :MIN_ROW_TO_FETCH;

(Copied from specified AskTom-article)

Update 2: Starting with Oracle 12c (12.1) there is a syntax available to limit rows or start at offsets.

SELECT * 
FROM   sometable
ORDER BY name
OFFSET 20 ROWS FETCH NEXT 10 ROWS ONLY;

See this answer for more examples. Thanks to Krumia for the hint.

share|improve this answer
14  
+1 for the Ask Tom link –  Nick Pierpoint Jan 23 '09 at 10:43
3  
I was trying to get to that second one, but screwing it up royally. Thanks. –  Mathieu Longtin Jan 23 '09 at 15:38
1  
+1 your lower/upper version actually helped me work around an issue where a mere upper-bounded rownum clause was drastically slowing down my query. –  Kelvin Aug 9 '11 at 22:21
1  
The Leigh Riffel "analytic solution with only one nested query" is the one. –  Darren Hicks Mar 27 '12 at 23:22
1  
The AskTom article has an optimizer hint as well that uses SELECT /*+ FIRST_ROWS(n) / a., rownum rnum The closing slash should be preceded by an asterisk. SO is scrubbing it out. –  David Mann Mar 5 '13 at 15:34

I did some performance testing between:

A.) Asktom

select * from (
  select a.*, ROWNUM rnum from (
    <select statemenet with order by clause>
  ) a where rownum <= MAX_ROW
) where rnum >= MIN_ROW

B.) Analytic approach

select * from (
  <select statemenet with order by clause>
) where myrow between MIN_ROW and MAX_ROW

C.) Short alternative

select * from (
  select statement, rownum as RN with order by clause
) where a.rn >= MIN_ROW and a.rn <= MAX_ROW

Results:

Table had 10 million records, sort was on an unindexed datetime row:

  • Explain plan showed same value for all three selects (323168)
  • But the winner is AskTom (with analytic following close behind)

Selecting first 10 rows took:

  • AskTom: 28-30 seconds
  • Analytical: 33-37 seconds
  • Short alternative: 110-140 seconds

Selecting rows betwwen 100.000 and 100.010:

  • AskTom: 60 seconds
  • Analytical: 100 seconds

Selecting rows between 9.000.000 and 9.000.010:

  • AskTom: 130 seconds
  • Analytical: 150 seconds
share|improve this answer
    
Nice work. Did you try the short alternative with a between instead of >= and <=? –  Mathieu Longtin Jul 5 '11 at 14:55
2  
@MathieuLongtin BETWEEN is just a shorthand for >= AND <= (stackoverflow.com/questions/4809083/between-clause-versus-and) –  wweicker Oct 20 '11 at 15:27
1  
zeldi - Which version was this on? Oracle has made analytic performance improvements in 11.1. and 11.2. –  Leigh Riffel Sep 26 '12 at 12:03
    
@Leigh Riffel It was 10.2.0.5; one day I might take time and also check the 11i version. –  zeldi Mar 11 '13 at 9:17
    
I ran some quick tests and got similar results for 12c. The new offset syntax has the same plan and performance as the analytic approach. –  Jon Heller Jan 18 at 4:17

An analytic solution with only one nested query:

SELECT * FROM
(
   SELECT t.*, Row_Number() OVER (ORDER BY name) MyRow FROM sometable t
) 
WHERE MyRow BETWEEN 10 AND 20;

Rank() could be substituted for Row_Number() but might return more records than you are expecting if there are duplicate values for name.

share|improve this answer
2  
I love analytics. You might want to clarify what the difference in behavior would be between Rank() and Row_Number(). –  Dave Costa Jan 23 '09 at 16:53
3  
There is a difference between rank() and row_number() when there are ties. You see here an example with the differences between dense_rank, rank and row_number. adp-gmbh.ch/ora/sql/analytical/… –  tuinstoel Jan 24 '09 at 7:23
    
Indeed, not sure why I didn't think about duplicates. So, in this case if there are duplicate values for name then RANK could give more records than you are expecting therefore you should use Row_Number. –  Leigh Riffel Jan 26 '09 at 14:11

On Oracle 12c (see row limiting clause in SQL reference):

SELECT * 
FROM sometable
ORDER BY name
OFFSET 20 ROWS FETCH NEXT 10 ROWS ONLY;
share|improve this answer
17  
And of course, they had to use a totally different syntax than everybody else so far –  Mathieu Longtin Sep 25 '13 at 1:12
5  
Clearly after sitting down with all the other vendors to agree on LIMIT in SQL:2008 they then had to take a leaf out of Microsoft's book and break the standard. –  beldaz Sep 25 '13 at 1:39
2  
Its insane. Why not stick to the standard! –  Derek Dec 19 '13 at 10:19
1  
Interestingly I heard recently that the most recent standard includes this syntax, so maybe Oracle pushed it in first before implementing. Arguably it is more flexible than LIMIT ... OFFSET –  beldaz Dec 31 '13 at 23:08
2  
@Derek: Yes, not following the standard is regrettable. But newly introduced functionality in 12cR1 is more powerful than just LIMIT n, m (See my answer). Then again, Oracle should have implemented LIMIT n, m as syntactic sugar, as it is equivalent to OFFSET n ROWS FETCH NEXT m ROWS ONLY. –  Krumia Sep 26 at 13:54

Starting from Oracle 12c R1 (12.1), there is a row limiting clause. It does not use familiar LIMIT, but it can do the job better with more options. You can find the full syntax here.

To answer the original question, here's the query:

SELECT * 
FROM   sometable
ORDER BY name
OFFSET 20 ROWS FETCH NEXT 10 ROWS ONLY;

Examples:

Following examples were quoted from linked page, in the hope of preventing link rot.

Setup

CREATE TABLE rownum_order_test (
  val  NUMBER
);

INSERT ALL
  INTO rownum_order_test
  INTO rownum_order_test
SELECT level
FROM   dual
CONNECT BY level <= 10;

COMMIT;

What's in the table?

SELECT val
FROM   rownum_order_test
ORDER BY val;

       VAL
----------
         1
         1
         2
         2
         3
         3
         4
         4
         5
         5
         6
         6
         7
         7
         8
         8
         9
         9
        10
        10

20 rows selected.

Get first N rows

SELECT val
FROM   rownum_order_test
ORDER BY val DESC
FETCH FIRST 5 ROWS ONLY;

       VAL
----------
        10
        10
         9
         9
         8

5 rows selected.

Get first N rows, if Nth row has ties, get all the tied rows

SELECT val
FROM   rownum_order_test
ORDER BY val DESC
FETCH FIRST 5 ROWS WITH TIES;

       VAL
----------
        10
        10
         9
         9
         8
         8

6 rows selected.

Top x% of rows

SELECT val
FROM   rownum_order_test
ORDER BY val
FETCH FIRST 20 PERCENT ROWS ONLY;

       VAL
----------
         1
         1
         2
         2

4 rows selected.

Using an offset, very useful for pagination

SELECT val
FROM   rownum_order_test
ORDER BY val
OFFSET 4 ROWS FETCH NEXT 4 ROWS ONLY;

       VAL
----------
         3
         3
         4
         4

4 rows selected.

You can combine offset with percentages

SELECT val
FROM   rownum_order_test
ORDER BY val
OFFSET 4 ROWS FETCH NEXT 20 PERCENT ROWS ONLY;

       VAL
----------
         3
         3
         4
         4

4 rows selected.
share|improve this answer

Less SELECT statements. Also, less performance consuming. Credits to: anibal@upf.br

SELECT *
    FROM   (SELECT t.*,
                   rownum AS rn
            FROM   shhospede t) a
    WHERE  a.rn >= in_first
    AND    a.rn <= in_first;
share|improve this answer
2  
I don't see how this is better than the accepted answer. –  Mathieu Longtin Mar 7 '11 at 15:55

Same as above with corrections. Works but definitely not pretty.

   WITH
    base AS
    (
        select *                   -- get the table
        from sometable
        order by name              -- in the desired order
    ),
    twenty AS
    (
        select *                   -- get the first 30 rows
        from base
        where rownum <= 30
        order by name              -- in the desired order
    )
    select *                       -- then get rows 21 .. 30
    from twenty
    where rownum < 20
    order by name                  -- in the desired order

Honestly, better to use the above answers.

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3  
This is incorrect as the WHERE clause is evaluated before the ORDER BY. –  Ben Sep 8 '13 at 12:21

Pagination queries with ordering are really tricky in Oracle.

Oracle provides a ROWNUM pseudocolumn that returns a number indicating the order in which the database selects the row from a table or set of joined views.

ROWNUM is a pseudocolumn that gets many people into trouble. A ROWNUM value is not permanently assigned to a row (this is a common misunderstanding). It may be confusing when a ROWNUM value is actually assigned. A ROWNUM value is assigned to a row after it passes filter predicates of the query but before query aggregation or sorting.

What is more, a ROWNUM value is incremented only after it is assigned.

This is why the followin query returns no rows:

 select * 
 from (select *
       from some_table
       order by some_column)
 where ROWNUM <= 4 and ROWNUM > 1; 

The first row of the query result does not pass ROWNUM > 1 predicate, so ROWNUM does not increment to 2. For this reason, no ROWNUM value gets greater than 1, consequently, the query returns no rows.

Correctly defined query should look like this:

select *
from (select *, ROWNUM rnum
      from (select *
            from skijump_results
            order by points)
      where ROWNUM <= 4)
where rnum > 1; 

Find out more about pagination queries in my articles on Vertabelo blog:

share|improve this answer

(untested) something like this may do the job

WITH
base AS
(
    select *                   -- get the table
    from sometable
    order by name              -- in the desired order
),
twenty AS
(
    select *                   -- get the first 30 rows
    from base
    where rownum < 30
    order by name              -- in the desired order
)
select *                       -- then get rows 21 .. 30
from twenty
where rownum > 20
order by name                  -- in the desired order

There is also the analytic function rank, that you can use to order by.

share|improve this answer
2  
This won't return a single row as the ROWNUM is a column on the resultset so that last WHERE condition will always be false. Plus you can't use ROWNUM and an ORDER BY an guarantee ORDER. –  Ben Sep 8 '13 at 12:20
    
Excellent. Let's leave this here as a warning to others. –  EvilTeach Jan 21 at 15:33

Late contribution. The best course of action which is compatible across most versions of Oracle DBs is to use ROW_NUMBER analytic function. Because it is calculated after order by it produces a lot more consistent results.

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select * 
  from (select ee.* ,rownum r 
    from (select e.last_name,e.salary 
        from employees e order by e.salary desc) ee)  eee 
           where eee.r>=5 and eee.r<=10 ;

like this,in HR Schemas.

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10  
This solution has already been posted, multiple times, in other answers here. Please don't add answers to age-old, already fully answered questions unless you're adding a new solution or something has changed since the answers were posted (new features in new product versions for instance). –  Mat Apr 21 '13 at 7:44

In oracle

SELECT val FROM   rownum_order_test ORDER BY val DESC FETCH FIRST 5 ROWS ONLY;

VAL

    10
    10
     9
     9
     8

5 rows selected.

SQL>

share|improve this answer
2  
You should specify that this applies starting from Oracle 12c, and that you copy/pasted that from somewhere - please always cite your sources. –  Mat Aug 21 at 9:55
    
The source is this @Mat. And Rakesh, please try at least to adapt the answer for the original question. I have also provided an answer quoting the same source, but I tried to be comprehensive and cited the original source. –  Krumia Sep 26 at 14:03

protected by Mat Apr 21 '13 at 7:41

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