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I'm trying to force download files from my web server using PHP. I'm not a pro in PHP but I just can't seem to get around the problem of files downloading in 0 bytes in size.

CODE:

$filename = "FILENAME...";

header("Content-type: $type");
header("Content-Disposition: attachment;filename=$filename");
header("Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary");
header('Pragma: no-cache');
header('Expires: 0');
set_time_limit(0);
readfile($file);

Can anybody help? Thanks.

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2  
Are you sure the given file exists using that path and has some content? –  Gumbo Jan 16 '11 at 15:11
1  
Just a small note, but you should watch out for directory traversal. A potential attacker could use, for instance, "../../../../var/www/config.php" and may read some sensitive data. –  Ralph Wiggum Jan 20 '11 at 5:46

5 Answers 5

You're not checking that the file exists. Try using this:

$file = 'monkey.gif';

if (file_exists($file))
{
    header('Content-Description: File Transfer');
    header('Content-Type: application/octet-stream');
    header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename='.basename($file));
    header('Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary');
    header('Expires: 0');
    header('Cache-Control: must-revalidate, post-check=0, pre-check=0');
    header('Pragma: public');
    header('Content-Length: ' . filesize($file));
    ob_clean();
    flush();
    readfile($file);
    exit;
}else
{
    echo "File does not exists";
}

And see what you get.


You should also note that this forces a download as an octet stream, a plain binary file. Some browsers will struggle to understand the exact type of the file. If, for example, you send a GIF with a header of Content-Type: application/octet-stream, then the browser may not treat it like a GIF image. You should add in specific checks to determine what the content type of the file is, and send an appropriate Content-Type header.

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Thanks Robert, but it didn't seem to work :/ –  Alex Jan 16 '11 at 15:19
1  
This does work, I think you need extend your question with what browser your using, what the file is, where its located, the permissions of the file as well dir, and what server your running. –  RobertPitt Jan 16 '11 at 15:25
    
thanks for this. I had the 0 byte problem with ppt files only. The ob_clean() and flush() before the stream_get_contents() helped. –  pduersteler Jan 10 '12 at 12:50
    
Thanks this saved me some time. –  Keeper Hood Nov 5 '12 at 20:43
    
According to PHP site, php.net/manual/en/function.readfile.php#102137 header('Content-Length: ' . filesize($file)); $file should really be the full path to the file. Otherwise content length will not always be set, often resulting in the dreaded "0 byte file" problem. Or just try like this header('Content-Length: ' . filesize($filePath)); First set path like this and it immediately worked for me and 0 BYTES problem solved!!! –  webblover Jan 16 at 11:11

You need to specify the Content-Length header:

header("Content-Length: " . filesize($filename));

Also, you shouldn't send a Content-Transfer-Encoding header. Both of the HTTP/1.0 and HTTP/1.1 specs state that "HTTP does not use the Content-Transfer-Encoding (CTE) field of RFC 1521".

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I use the following method in phunction and I haven't had any issues with it so far:

function Download($path, $speed = null)
{
    if (is_file($path) === true)
    {
        $file = @fopen($path, 'rb');
        $speed = (isset($speed) === true) ? round($speed * 1024) : 524288;

        if (is_resource($file) === true)
        {
            set_time_limit(0);
            ignore_user_abort(false);

            while (ob_get_level() > 0)
            {
                ob_end_clean();
            }

            header('Expires: 0');
            header('Pragma: public');
            header('Cache-Control: must-revalidate, post-check=0, pre-check=0');
            header('Content-Type: application/octet-stream');
            header('Content-Length: ' . sprintf('%u', filesize($path)));
            header('Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="' . basename($path) . '"');
            header('Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary');

            while (feof($file) !== true)
            {
                echo fread($file, $speed);

                while (ob_get_level() > 0)
                {
                    ob_end_flush();
                }

                flush();
                sleep(1);
            }

            fclose($file);
        }

        exit();
    }

    return false;
}

You can try it simply by doing:

Download('/path/to/file.ext');
share|improve this answer
    
Nice little implementation to the throttling :) –  RobertPitt Jan 16 '11 at 15:15
    
Thank you so much, but it didn't seem to work :/ –  Alex Jan 16 '11 at 15:17
1  
@Alex: I think that may be the problem... Try specifying the absolute path to the file, something like $filename = 'C:/www/test.zip';. –  Alix Axel Jan 16 '11 at 15:42
1  
@Alix: If I wanted to create my own CDN, then I would set up a Squid cache with delay pools: faqs.org/docs/Linux-HOWTO/Bandwidth-Limiting-HOWTO.html –  Daniel Trebbien Jan 16 '11 at 15:43
1  
@Alex: Are you on Linux or Windows? Imagine that the absolute path to the Letter.txt file is /home/user/docs/Letter.txt, if your current working directory is /home/user/ the relative path to the file is ./docs/Letter.txt however the absolute path is always the same (/home/user/docs/Letter.txt) no matter where you are... This is kinda hard to explain clearly in a comment and I would have to know your filesystem structure to give you a specific answer, read this (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Path_(computing)) maybe it helps you. –  Alix Axel Jan 16 '11 at 15:53

This problem as same as my website project. This code I've used:

<?php

$file = $_SERVER["DOCUMENT_ROOT"].'/.../.../'.$_GET['file'];

 if(!file)
 {
     // File doesn't exist, output error
     die('file not found');
 }
 else
 {

    //$file_extension = strtolower(substr(strrchr($file,"."),1));
    $file_extension = end(explode(".", $file));

    switch( $fileExtension)
    {
    case "pdf": $ctype="application/pdf"; break;
    case "exe": $ctype="application/octet-stream"; break;
    case "zip": $ctype="application/zip"; break;
    case "doc": $ctype="application/msword"; break;
    case "xls": $ctype="application/vnd.ms-excel"; break;
    case "ppt": $ctype="application/vnd.ms-powerpoint"; break;
    case "gif": $ctype="image/gif"; break;
    case "png": $ctype="image/png"; break;
    case "jpeg":
    case "jpg": $ctype="image/jpg"; break;
    default: $ctype="application/force-download";
    }

    nocache_headers();

     // Set headers
    header("Pragma: public"); // required
    header("Expires: 0");
    header("Cache-Control: must-revalidate, post-check=0, pre-check=0");
    header("Cache-Control: public"); // required for certain browsers
    header("Content-Description: File Transfer");
    header("Content-Type: $ctype");
    header("Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=".$file.";" );
    header("Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary");
    header("Content-Length: ".filesize($file));

     readfile($file);
 }
 ?>

I think the problem is on the server setting like PHP setting or cache setting, but I don't have any idea to do this my opinion.

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i am doing this to download a PDF ...

$filename = 'Application.pdf';
header("Content-Type: application/pdf");
header("Content-Disposition: attachment; filename=$filename");
echo $pdf;

i think you are missing the last row, where you actually send the file contents of whatever you have in $file.

Pablo

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