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I have a query you can see example below:

SELECT TOP(50000)* FROM
[Database].[dbo].[Table] WHERE Column
IS NOT NULL ORDER BY Column2 DESC

To execute it takes 2 min 21 sec, in total records about 350K

Columns types

ID int
Column1 nvarchar(50)
Column2 nvarchar(250)
Column3 datetime
Column4 nvarchar(1000)
Column5 nvarchar(1000)
Column6 nvarchar(50)

In my opinion it takes to long. can anyone suggest me how to improve performance? Or maybe someone knows what can be the root cause?

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1  
Can you post the execution plan? – a_horse_with_no_name Jan 16 '11 at 16:23

Several things:

  • Do you have an index on the "column" where you filter? The column number is not in your question
  • It may not help, you have SELECT *
  • Does the index use column2?
  • Have you tried separately?

Design

  • Do you need nvarchar? Make it varchar

Basically, you are returning around 1/7 of the table so any index on the filter column may be ignored, coupled with SELECT *. An index on column2 may help to avoid intermediate sorting.

Edit:

With 3 columns, you can make it covering (as marc_s' comment)

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Ok I changed my columns types to varchar and made it smaller. the same query takes now 1 min, 14 sec.Thank you Is there anything else I can improve to make it faster? – Bogdan Jan 16 '11 at 16:28
    
Also instead of * all I changed to select 3 columns and now it takes no more than 25 sec on the same query – Bogdan Jan 16 '11 at 16:38
1  
@Bogdan: if you had an index that would have these three columns you need in it - possibly as INCLUDE columns - then you might see another big boost in performance – marc_s Jan 16 '11 at 17:55

You are returning a large amount of data - network IO may easily account for the time taken.

You may also missing an index on your column2 column, which can cause a table scan instead of an index seek (expensive vs cheap operation).

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Have you put an index on column2 (the one used for order by)?

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Yes I have index on that column USE [Database] GO CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [ID] ON [dbo].[Table] ( [ID] DESC )WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY] GO – Bogdan Jan 16 '11 at 16:01
    
That sounds like an index on column 'id' and not on 'column2' or 'column' (the one you filter on, which isn't in the table description.) – Inca Jan 16 '11 at 16:16

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