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I was wondering if defining your language in HTML is better for search enigines. For example, I've got a French site, then i've got three options:

1.) have faith that google can say my site is french

2.) define language in the HTML tag

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" dir="ltr" lang="fr">

3.) define language in a meta tag

<meta http-equiv="content-language" content="FR-fr" />

Which option you believe is best? Or which combination of options?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

language (language (i.e.: french) != location market (i.e. france)) detection is done on a per page basis (not per site).

it detects the language via the words used on the page (and in the URL), it does not care about the HTML tag (1) and the meta tag (2).

(you can test via the language detect api what language google thinks your page is using http://code.google.com/apis/language/translate/v1/using_rest_langdetect.html )

i always go for the 1 page === 1 language approche. i always make sure that i only have one language per page (translating all of the navigation, making sure that other language content does not and can not show up on the page)

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It's probably better to define anything you can and have the search engine disregard it, than to not and leave it completely up to chance. The more information you give them the better.

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Why then, most sites ranked high in google don't use it? –  Kevin Jan 16 '11 at 16:38
    
perhaps for a variety of reasons not related to language? - most search engines rank on the content's context rather than meta information, so why would the language matter as long as the content is relevant to the topic being searched? –  jpea Jan 16 '11 at 16:41
    
yeah you could do "define anything you can and have the search engine disregard it" but this also means that you do not know what action caused what effect. plus you just end up with more and more work (maintenance, quality assurance). i strongly believe that the less work (and code) you produce the better. –  Franz Enzenhofer Jan 17 '11 at 11:12

Usually, I stick with the 3rd one, the content-language meta tag, as described here.

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1  
funny ey, the site you refer to doesn't use it itself? –  Kevin Jan 16 '11 at 16:37
    
Never practice what you preach ;-) –  Uwe Keim Jan 16 '11 at 16:47
    
ok, if we talk about google, forget it. it does not matter. the issue is that too many WYSIWYG editors prefill that argument with "en" so that it is not a reliable source. you can test this quite easily, just change all the content-language meta tags of your best performing site (or remove it alltogether) ... nothing happens. said that, i think bing has a blogpost that they take it into consideration (but hey, who cares about bing...) –  Franz Enzenhofer Jan 18 '11 at 12:57

probabay should be on webmasters.stackexchange.com but anyways

You should combine 2 and 3. Faith does not work with bots/spiders.

2.) define language in the HTML tag

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" dir="ltr" lang="fr">

3.) define language in a meta tag

<meta http-equiv="content-language" content="FR-fr" />

good luck

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On top of defining your language in the html you can signup for the Google Webmaster tools. On that site you can set your geographic target to France (Site configuration -> Settings).

http://www.google.com/webmasters/tools

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geographic target sets the target market (france) not the language (french) –  Franz Enzenhofer Jan 17 '11 at 9:43

andrewk is right - use 2 or 3 , but take into account that in most cases the language will be detected by the robot it self automatically.

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