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There are two types of if statements in java - classic: if {} else {} and shorthand: exp ? value1 : value2. Is one faster than the other or are they the same?

statement:

int x;
if (expression) {
  x = 1;
} else {
  x = 2;
}

ternary operator:

int x = (expression) ? 1 : 2;
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closed as not a real question by Ivo Wetzel, bmargulies, Henk Holterman, meagar, Graviton Jan 19 '11 at 1:56

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

29  
I'm guessing there's absolutely no difference. It's just syntax. Unless compilers are somewhat evil (or something else) and I'm wrong – sinelaw Jan 16 '11 at 16:58
4  
Did you (micro)benchmark it? Share the results. – BalusC Jan 16 '11 at 16:59
3  
Both will get jit'ed. There will be no difference at all. And don't bother decompiling the stuff. First thing that HotSpot does is to take out all optimizations that were applied by javac. – Ivo Wetzel Jan 16 '11 at 16:59
9  
They don't exist for different speeds. They exist for different purposes. I'm sure you understand the difference between statements and expressions. Statements perform actions. Expressions produce values. if is for use in statements. ? is for use in expressions. – Mike Dunlavey Jan 16 '11 at 17:05
2  
+1 as the responses to this question are worth reading even if the intent of the original question is mis-guided. – jball Jan 16 '11 at 17:17
up vote 78 down vote accepted

There's only one type of "if" statement there. The other is a conditional expression. As to which will perform better: they could compile to the same bytecode, and I would expect them to behave identically - or so close that you definitely wouldn't want to choose one over the other in terms of performance.

Sometimes an if statement will be more readable, sometimes the conditional operator will be more readable. In particular, I would recommend using the conditional operator when the two operands are simple and side-effect-free, whereas if the main purpose of the two branches is their side-effects, I'd probably use an if statement.

Here's a sample program and bytecode:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int x;
        if (args.length > 0) {
            x = 1;
        } else {
            x = 2;
        }
    }

    public static void main2(String[] args) {
        int x = (args.length > 0) ? 1 : 2;
    }
}

Bytecode decompiled with javap -c Test:

public class Test extends java.lang.Object {
  public Test();
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: invokespecial #1
       4: return

  public static void main(java.lang.String[]
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: arraylength
       2: ifle          10
       5: iconst_1
       6: istore_1
       7: goto          12
      10: iconst_2
      11: istore_1
      12: return

  public static void main2(java.lang.String[
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: arraylength
       2: ifle          9
       5: iconst_1
       6: goto          10
       9: iconst_2
      10: istore_1
      11: return
}

As you can see, there is a slight difference in bytecode here - whether the istore_1 occurs within the brance or not (unlike my previous hugely-flawed attempt :) but I would be very surprised if the JITter ended up with different native code.

share|improve this answer
    
s/conditional statement/conditional expression/ – Laurence Gonsalves Jan 16 '11 at 17:07
    
@Laurence: Doh - thanks, fixed. – Jon Skeet Jan 16 '11 at 17:09
1  
I'm guessing you didn't mean for both main and main2 to be exactly the same? – ColinD Jan 16 '11 at 17:15
1  
@Kyle: I compiled the Java, then decompiled with javap. – Jon Skeet Jan 16 '11 at 17:53
1  
@Kyle: Exactly. I'd mostly expected the bytecode to be identical. As it is, it's just nearly identical :) – Jon Skeet Jan 16 '11 at 17:59

Both of your examples will probably compile to identical or nearly identical bytecode, so there should be no difference in performance.

Had there been a difference in execution speed, you should still use the most idiomatic version (which would be the second one for assigning a single variable based on a simple condition and two simple sub-expressions, and the first one for doing more complex operations or operations that do not fit on a single line).

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-1 For being wrong. If you're going to claim two pieces of code will compile to the same bytecode without even providing a qualifier like "probably" or "I think," you could at least actually check that they do so. Though even if they do compile to the same bytecode, that would not guarantee that other versions of the Java compiler would not compile to different byte code. – Brian Jan 17 '11 at 6:05
    
@Brian: you are right. I edited my answer. – Victor Nicollet Jan 17 '11 at 8:05
1  
OK, I removed my -1 :) – Brian Jan 17 '11 at 21:22

These are the same. Both of them are fairly fast, typically around 10-30 nano-seconds. (depending on usage pattern) Is this time frame important to you?

You should do what you believe is clearest.

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neither - they will be compiled to the same.

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Just to add to all the other answers:

The second expression is often called tertiary/ternary operator/statement. It can be very useful because it returns an expression. Sometimes it makes the code more clearer for typical short statements.

share|improve this answer
    
Great example of this in practice: in Java, if I have to make a String final based on the result of an expression, i can use the ternary syntax final String whichTable = (Integer.parseInt(clientId) > 500) ? "serverClients" : "offlineClients"; Then I can use the value of the expression in places where whichTable needs to be final. The following would be illegal: final String whichTable = ""; if (Integer.parseInt(clientId) > 500) { whichTable = "serverClients"; } else { whichTable = "offlineClients"; } – James Perih Sep 12 '13 at 20:48
    
@JamesPerih Exactly. – Secko Oct 30 '13 at 0:54

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