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How do I check if a string was hashed up to a certain bits? I want to unit test my method (which uses SHA512), I want to write a test to check if that string returned was 512-bit hashed.

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Try and decrypt it with the keys; if it works, it was probably encrypted...? Note most encrypted data is binary not text; attempting to treat it as a string may cause data loss. –  Marc Gravell Jan 16 '11 at 18:07
    
@Marc Gravell Its 1 way password hashing. It has to be a string. –  Dawdie Jan 16 '11 at 18:10
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@Dawdie hashing produces binary result, not a string. Also I'd strongly recommend you to edit your question and redefine what you mean by encryption -- SHA512 is a hash algorithm, not an encrypted algorithm. Do you use anything else for encryption? If no, why confuse readers? –  Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp Jan 16 '11 at 18:14
    
@dawdie - to reiterate the point above - most hashes are binary. if you want a string, run the binary through base-64 –  Marc Gravell Jan 16 '11 at 18:24
    
@Eugene - SHA512 should produce a byte array and not a binary result... But in a sense a byte array is nothing else than an array of binary arrays... –  Matten Jan 16 '11 at 18:25

3 Answers 3

You can't determine if the string is encrypted only with the string itself. One could enter data that is similar to the result of your SHA512 hash function, but without being actually hashed.

If you know that it is hashed and you want to know if SHA512 was used, the only thing you can verify is if the string is 512 bit long, but that wont tell you for sure if it's SHA512.

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Whats the method to check if the string is 512bit? –  Dawdie Jan 16 '11 at 18:11
    
A char has 256 valid values, therefore a char is 8 bit long. If the string length * 8 is 512, it is 512 bit long –  Matten Jan 16 '11 at 18:13
    
@Matten In C# the char is 16 bit long. –  mgronber Jan 16 '11 at 18:27
    
@mgronber -- good to know, thought it was 8 bit encoded.. Thank you :) –  Matten Jan 16 '11 at 18:29
    
@mgronber, so I just do a check like: `Assert.IsEqual(512, (hash.Length *16)); –  Dawdie Jan 16 '11 at 18:55

If it's a one-way hash (you don't state that it is, but your use of SHA512 implies it), then it can't be decrypted. Really, the only way to test it is to:

  • Take known input (i.e., a known plaintext string).
  • Calculate, by other means that you trust, what the expected encryption output should be.
  • Ensure that your program or routine produces that output for that string.

Repeat with various inputs, until you're satisfied.

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Please repeat after me: Hashing is not Encryption. The input data for your hash algorithm is lost, and cannot be recovered.

SHA-512 has an output 512 bits long, so someone presenting you with 512 bits and saying it's the output of a SHA-512 algorithm could be correct. As far as I know there's no readily identifable pattern to the output of SHA algorithm though, so they could be just presenting you with 512 bits of pure random noise.

Can you explain why you would want to identify the algorithm used to generate a particular hash?

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...and now I see others beat me to the punch in saying this. –  Will Hughes Jan 16 '11 at 18:25

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