Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a linq query as follow:

public static ViewUserDisplayPreferences GetUserDisplayPreferences(int TheUserID)
{

    using ( MyDataContext TheDC = new MyDataContext() )
    {

        var OutputUserDisplayPreferences = from user in TheDC.Users
                                    where user.UserID == TheUserID
                                    select new ViewUserDisplayPreferences
                                    {
                                        UserTimeFormat = user.UserTimeDisplay
                                    };

        return (ViewUserDisplayPreferences)(OutputUserDisplayPreferences);
    }
}

For the moment, the object ViewUserDisplayPreferences is defined as follow (more variables will be added later):

public class ViewUserDisplayPreferences
{
public string UserTimeFormat { get; set; }
};

On the return statement at runtime, I get this error:

Unable to cast object of type 'System.Data.Linq.DataQuery`1[ObjectsUsers.ViewUserDisplayPreferences]' to type 'ObjectsUsers.ViewUserDisplayPreferences'.]

What's wrong with the code? The intellisense is not showing any error on the line?

Thanks

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

OutputUserDisplayPreferences is an IEnumerable<T>. If you want an object, use either the First (if there can be more than one) or Single (if you know for sure only one object will be in the sequence) method on the sequence. If it is possible for the sequence to be empty, use the respective *OrDefault method.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Linq returns a collection. Try adding a .FirstOrDefault to the end.

share|improve this answer
    
You read it in books but it comes to make sense later, when you're stuck. Thanks. –  frenchie Jan 16 '11 at 20:30
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.