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I'm currently using the following function to 'convert' a relative URL to an absolute one:

function qualifyURL(url) {
	var a = document.createElement('a');
	a.href = url;
	return a.href;
}

This works quite well in most browsers but IE6 insists on returning the relative URL still! It does the same if I use getAttribute('href').

The only way I've been able to get a qualified URL out of IE6 is to create an img element and query it's 'src' attribute - the problem with this is that it generates a server request; something I want to avoid.

So my question is: Is there any way to get a fully qualified URL in IE6 from a relative one (without a server request)?


Before you recommend a quick regex/string fix I assure you it's not that simple. Base elements + double period relative urls + a tonne of other potential variables really make it hell!

There must be a way to do it without having to create a mammoth of a regex'y solution??

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You could use js-uri to resolve the relative URI to an absolute one. –  Gumbo Jan 22 '09 at 21:58
    
Thank you Gumbo, I suppose this'll have to do. I would've liked a more concise solution but thank you anyway, I never knew this js-uri class existed! –  James Jan 23 '09 at 8:15
2  
Sweet hack! Don't care about IE6. Saved me hours. You rock. –  Tom Harrison Jr Feb 14 '12 at 16:03
    
I didn't got it working with this, I have just "foo" and I want "example.com/foo"; –  Jaime Hablutzel Jun 14 '12 at 22:05
    
The js-uri library does not seem to do what the original poster wants. –  djsmith Dec 13 '12 at 20:52
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10 Answers 10

How strange! IE does, however, understand it when you use innerHTML instead of DOM methods.

function escapeHTML(s) {
    return s.split('&').join('&amp;').split('<').join('&lt;').split('"').join('&quot;');
}
function qualifyURL(url) {
    var el= document.createElement('div');
    el.innerHTML= '<a href="'+escapeHTML(url)+'">x</a>';
    return el.firstChild.href;
}

A bit ugly, but more concise than Doing It Yourself.

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Awesome, thanks bobince! –  James Jan 24 '09 at 21:18
1  
This method works great for me! Thanks for posting it! –  zachleat Oct 19 '09 at 20:09
    
Confirmed working in IE7. –  djsmith Dec 13 '12 at 20:57
    
jsfiddle.net/z9MQE –  fsb Jul 6 '13 at 19:40
    
I found this similar solution on a blog which doesn't need the code to escape: stackoverflow.com/a/22918332/82609 –  Sebastien Lorber Apr 7 at 16:46
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As long as the browser implements the <base> tag correctly, which browsers tend to:

function resolve(url, base_url) {
  var doc      = document
    , old_base = doc.getElementsByTagName('base')[0]
    , old_href = old_base && old_base.href
    , doc_head = doc.head || doc.getElementsByTagName('head')[0]
    , our_base = old_base || doc_head.appendChild(doc.createElement('base'))
    , resolver = doc.createElement('a')
    , resolved_url
    ;
  our_base.href = base_url;
  resolver.href = url;
  resolved_url  = resolver.href; // browser magic at work here

  if (old_base) old_base.href = old_href;
  else doc_head.removeChild(our_base);
  return resolved_url;
}

Here's a jsfiddle where you can experiment with it: http://jsfiddle.net/ecmanaut/RHdnZ/

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waho, best response ever. I wish I can upvote 10 times. –  Hartator Jul 2 '13 at 23:08
    
It's three years late to the party, so it will take awhile to rise to the top without either marketing or lots of people having the issue and wanting a code-conservative and accurate solution. –  ecmanaut Jul 3 '13 at 17:11
    
Better late than ever. I think your solution is clever and more robust than the other, to rely on the browser seems the way to do. Even if it might be perceived king of hacky to inject base tag. –  Hartator Jul 5 '13 at 10:41
    
Other than supporting arbitrary base URLs, how exactly is this different than the solution presented in the question? Does it work on IE 6? –  John Jul 21 '13 at 1:27
    
That is the only difference. If you have an IE6 around, follow the link above and try; if the last form element says google.com/search?foo=bar it does work in IE6. –  ecmanaut Jul 21 '13 at 7:59
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You could use https://gist.github.com/1088850 to resolve the relative URI to an absolute one. It's simple and pure js.

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1  
This may be really useful for server side JS. –  Konstantin Smolyanin Aug 7 '13 at 11:08
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I found this blog post that suggests using an image element instead of an anchor:

http://james.padolsey.com/javascript/getting-a-fully-qualified-url/

That works to reliably expand a URL, even in IE6. But the problem is that the browsers that I have tested will immediately download the resource upon setting the image src attribute - even if you set the src to null on the next line.

I am going to give bobince's solution a go instead.

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URI.js seems to solve the issue:

URI("../foobar.html").absoluteTo("http://example.org/hello/world.html").toString()

See also http://medialize.github.io/URI.js/docs.html#absoluteto

Not testeed with IE6, but maybe helpful for others searching to the general issue.

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This solution works in all browsers.

/**
 * Given a filename for a static resource, returns the resource's absolute
 * URL. Supports file paths with or without origin/protocol.
 */
function toAbsoluteURL (url) {
  // Handle absolute URLs (with protocol-relative prefix)
  // Example: //domain.com/file.png
  if (url.search(/^\/\//) != -1) {
    return window.location.protocol + url
  }

  // Handle absolute URLs (with explicit origin)
  // Example: http://domain.com/file.png
  if (url.search(/:\/\//) != -1) {
    return url
  }

  // Handle absolute URLs (without explicit origin)
  // Example: /file.png
  if (url.search(/^\//) != -1) {
    return window.location.origin + url
  }

  // Handle relative URLs
  // Example: file.png
  var base = window.location.href.match(/(.*\/)/)[0]
  return base + url

However, it doesn't support relative URLs with ".." in them, like "../file.png".

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I found on this blog another method that really looks like @bobince solution.

function canonicalize(url) {
    var div = document.createElement('div');
    div.innerHTML = "<a></a>";
    div.firstChild.href = url; // Ensures that the href is properly escaped
    div.innerHTML = div.innerHTML; // Run the current innerHTML back through the parser
    return div.firstChild.href;
}

I found it a little more elegant, not a big deal.

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If it runs in the browser, this sort of works for me..

  function resolveURL(url, base){
    if(/^https?:/.test(url))return url; // url is absolute
    // let's try a simple hack..
    var basea=document.createElement('a'), urla=document.createElement('a');
    basea.href=base, urla.href=url;
    urla.protocol=basea.protocol;// "inherit" the base's protocol and hostname
    if(!/^\/\//.test(url))urla.hostname=basea.hostname; //..hostname only if url is not protocol-relative  though
    if( /^\//.test(url) )return urla.href; // url starts with /, we're done
    var urlparts=url.split(/\//); // create arrays for the url and base directory paths
    var baseparts=basea.pathname.split(/\//); 
    if( ! /\/$/.test(base) )baseparts.pop(); // if base has a file name after last /, pop it off
    while( urlparts[0]=='..' ){baseparts.pop();urlparts.shift();} // remove .. parts from url and corresponding directory levels from base
    urla.pathname=baseparts.join('/')+'/'+urlparts.join('/');
    return urla.href;
  }
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You can make it work on IE6 just cloning the element:

function qualifyURL(url) {
    var a = document.createElement('a');
    a.href = url;
    return a.cloneNode(false).href;
}

(Tested using IETester on IE6 and IE5.5 modes)

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If url does not begin with '/'

Take the current page's url, chop off everything past the last '/'; then append the relative url.

Else if url begins with '/'

Take the current page's url and chop off everything to the right of the single '/'; then append the url.

Else if url starts with # or ?

Take the current page's url and simply append url


Hope it works for you

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1  
You forgot that URLs can begin with "//", which makes them scheme-relative. //foo.com/bar/ –  Scott Wolchok Mar 7 '10 at 6:19
1  
you also forgot the dotted relative ../../ syntax (whether this omission matters or no depends on what the output is required for) –  hallvors Dec 5 '12 at 11:14
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