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About 6 months ago I rolled out a site where every request needed to be over https. The only way at the time I could find to ensure that every request to a page was over https was to check it in the page load event. If the request was not over http I would response.redirect("https://mysite.com")

Is there a better way -- ideally some setting in the web.config?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 88 down vote accepted

found this

-- dead link removed --

basically

protected void Application_BeginRequest(Object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   if (HttpContext.Current.Request.IsSecureConnection.Equals(false) && HttpContext.Current.Request.IsLocal.Equals(false))
   {
    Response.Redirect("https://" + Request.ServerVariables["HTTP_HOST"]
+   HttpContext.Current.Request.RawUrl);
   }
}

that would go in the global.asax.cs (or global.asax.vb)

i dont know of a way to specify it in the web.config

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1  
+1: I just used implemented this, it works great! –  Brian MacKay Oct 16 '09 at 15:27
3  
This works, but it was dangerous for me: when I attempted to run locally in VS 2010 with this code running, my start page never loaded; instead, I just received a "This webpage is not available" message. To fix, I added a second condition to test if the url contains the string "localhost": if it does not, then force https. –  mg1075 Aug 25 '11 at 13:43
1  
This is giving me a redirect loop. Before I added the code it worked fine. Any suggestions? –  Joe Nov 8 '11 at 4:13
    
+1, It is doing the redirect to server twice? First one, When you are explicitly redirecting and second one, when you are doing redirect in the Global.asax ? –  Pankaj Apr 25 '12 at 18:10
    
Link dead and possibly redirect to malware –  Hugh Jeffner Mar 25 at 20:40

The IIS7 module will let you redirect.

    <rewrite>
        <rules>
            <rule name="Redirect HTTP to HTTPS" stopProcessing="true">
                <match url="(.*)"/>
                <conditions>
                    <add input="{HTTPS}" pattern="^OFF$"/>
                </conditions>
                <action type="Redirect" url="https://{HTTP_HOST}/{R:1}" redirectType="SeeOther"/>
            </rule>
        </rules>
    </rewrite>
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+1, the best one. thanks ! looking for something similar, can u help? stackoverflow.com/questions/6556926/… –  tugberk Jul 2 '11 at 13:06
15  
This goes inside <system.webServer>, for anyone wondering. –  Chris Apr 12 '12 at 20:22
6  
Also, for IIS 7.0, you need to install Url Rewrite Module 2.0 –  Chris Apr 12 '12 at 20:42
    
+1 for a built-in solution! –  georgiosd Jun 6 '12 at 22:00
    
Thank you! This was just what I needed! –  TMc Nov 22 '13 at 6:33

The other thing you can do is use HSTS by returning the "Strict-Transport-Security" header to the browser. The browser has to support this (and at present, it's primarily Chrome and Firefox that do), but it means that once set, the browser won't make requests to the site over HTTP and will instead translate them to HTTPS requests before issuing them. Try this in combination with a redirect from HTTP:

protected void Application_BeginRequest(Object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  switch (Request.Url.Scheme)
  {
    case "https":
      Response.AddHeader("Strict-Transport-Security", "max-age=300");
      break;
    case "http":
      var path = "https://" + Request.Url.Host + Request.Url.PathAndQuery;
      Response.Status = "301 Moved Permanently";
      Response.AddHeader("Location", path);
      break;
  }
}

Browsers that aren't HSTS aware will just ignore the header but will still get caught by the switch statement and sent over to HTTPS.

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2  
Solid technique +1 –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Sep 13 '12 at 5:36
2  
Never heard about the HSTS header before, but looks pretty cool. Is there any reason for using such a small max-age value (5 minutes)? The Wikipedia article you link to suggests setting it to a large value (6-12 months). –  dana Feb 21 '13 at 19:13
4  
+1. check out this very extensive article on Troy's blog which includes details on why only using redirects can reduce security. Hint: it can leave you vulnerable to the SSL Strip tool, among other things. troyhunt.com/2011/11/… –  Oran May 3 '13 at 20:00
    
Also worth checking out NWebsec, which makes this (and more) very easy. –  Tieson T. Aug 7 at 3:24
    
You'll want to wrap the switch in if(!Request.IsLocal) so it doesn't break debugging. –  Justin J Stark Sep 3 at 16:00

If you are unable to set this up in IIS for whatever reason, I'd make an HTTP module that does the redirect for you:

using System;
using System.Web;

namespace HttpsOnly
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Redirects the Request to HTTPS if it comes in on an insecure channel.
    /// </summary>
    public class HttpsOnlyModule : IHttpModule
    {
        public void Init(HttpApplication app)
        {
            // Note we cannot trust IsSecureConnection when 
            // in a webfarm, because usually only the load balancer 
            // will come in on a secure port the request will be then 
            // internally redirected to local machine on a specified port.

            // Move this to a config file, if your behind a farm, 
            // set this to the local port used internally.
            int specialPort = 443;

            if (!app.Context.Request.IsSecureConnection 
               || app.Context.Request.Url.Port != specialPort)
            {
               app.Context.Response.Redirect("https://" 
                  + app.Context.Request.ServerVariables["HTTP_HOST"] 
                  + app.Context.Request.RawUrl);    
            }
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            // Needed for IHttpModule
        }
    }
}

Then just compile it to a DLL, add it as a reference to your project and place this in web.config:

 <httpModules>
      <add name="HttpsOnlyModule" type="HttpsOnly.HttpsOnlyModule, HttpsOnly" />
 </httpModules>
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This seems more involved than just sticking it in the global.asax -- just curious, is there an advantage? –  Brian MacKay Oct 16 '09 at 15:22
1  
The advantage would be, when you don't want to use it, just comment out the module in your web.config. This solution is configurable, whereas the other is not. –  Bob Yexley Nov 19 '09 at 13:19
2  
I am little confused. I'd expected something like app.BeginRequest += new OnBeginRequest; in the Init method and in the OnBeginRequest would contains what current Init method contains. Are you sure that this module works as expected? –  Jakub Šturc Aug 6 '10 at 10:33
    
It does not work. You do need to add the OnBeginRequest event etc, then it works. –  SnAzBaZ Nov 5 '10 at 11:31
    
Works now, I updated the code to use OnBeginRequest –  Adam Oct 27 '11 at 15:48

It also depends on the brand of your balancer, for the web mux, you would need to look for http header X-WebMux-SSL-termination: true to figure that incoming traffic was ssl. details here: http://www.cainetworks.com/support/redirect2ssl.html

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What you need to do is :

1) Add a key inside of web.config, depending upon the production or stage server like below

<add key="HttpsServer" value="stage"/>
             or
<add key="HttpsServer" value="prod"/>

2) Inside your Global.asax file add below method.

void Application_BeginRequest(Object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    //if (ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["HttpsServer"].ToString() == "prod")
    if (ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["HttpsServer"].ToString() == "stage")
    {
        if (!HttpContext.Current.Request.IsSecureConnection)
        {
            if (!Request.Url.GetLeftPart(UriPartial.Authority).Contains("www"))
            {
                HttpContext.Current.Response.Redirect(
                    Request.Url.GetLeftPart(UriPartial.Authority).Replace("http://", "https://www."), true);
            }
            else
            {
                HttpContext.Current.Response.Redirect(
                    Request.Url.GetLeftPart(UriPartial.Authority).Replace("http://", "https://"), true);
            }
        }
    }
}
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Another advantage in doing the http module is, if you only provide it in global.asax.cs, it only checks SSL upon Application_BeginRequest, which means your app is not fully protected; it will only route to SSL version the first try, then the user could cut and paste the none SSL url and bypass it.

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7  
Hi Aaron, no that isn't the case, as Application_BeginRequest runs on every request, so if the user changes to http in their browser, they will get redirected to https the next time they hit the server –  JonoW Apr 9 '10 at 15:48

For @Joe above, "This is giving me a redirect loop. Before I added the code it worked fine. Any suggestions? – Joe Nov 8 '11 at 4:13"

This was happening to me as well and what I believe was happening is that there was a load balancer terminating the SSL request in front of the Web server. So, my Web site was always thinking the request was "http", even if the original browser requested it to be "https".

I admit this is a bit hacky, but what worked for me was to implement a "JustRedirected" property that I could leverage to figure out the person was already redirected once. So, I test for specific conditions that warrant the redirect and, if they are met, I set this property (value stored in session) prior to the redirection. Even if the http/https conditions for redirection are met the second time, I bypass the redirection logic and reset the "JustRedirected" session value to false. You'll need your own conditional test logic, but here's a simple implementation of the property:

    public bool JustRedirected
    {
        get
        {
            if (Session[RosadaConst.JUSTREDIRECTED] == null)
                return false;

            return (bool)Session[RosadaConst.JUSTREDIRECTED];
        }
        set
        {
            Session[RosadaConst.JUSTREDIRECTED] = value;
        }
    }
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If SSL support is not configurable in your site (ie. should be able to turn https on/off) - you can use the [RequireHttps] attribute on any controller / controller action you wish to secure.

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