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I have a class, which has static function defined to work with C-style extern C { static void callback(foo bar) { } }. // static is defined in header.

Three objects (each in separate pthread) are instantiated from this class, each of them has own loop (in class constructor), which can receive the callback.

The pointer to function is passed as:

x = init_function(h, queue_id, &callback, NULL);
while(1) { loop_function(x); }

So each thread has the same pointer to &callback.

  1. Callback function can block for minutes.
  2. Each thread object, excluding the one which got the blocking callback, can call callback again.
  3. If the callback function exists only once, then any thread attempting to callback will also block. This would give me an undesired bug, circa is interesting to ask: can anything in C++ become acting this way? Maybe, due to extern { } or some pointer usage?
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I think it would be better if you posted more code, it is not so clear (to me at least) what is happening. E.g. you say "this class" what class? Also having a loop in the class constructor seems a bit dodgy. –  Claptrap Jan 17 '11 at 0:47
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This question does not make any sense. Would you care to post a minimal, but complete, code example? –  Billy ONeal Jan 17 '11 at 0:47
    
@Anders K., @Billy ONeal, minimal example would require creating external .so library with C init_function(), loop_function(), and C++ part to access them. In total: 3 files, so decided to ask instead of writing such unit test. –  kagali-san Jan 17 '11 at 0:53
    
However, the case is interesting enough, so will post minimal-complete example at the end of day. –  kagali-san Jan 17 '11 at 0:54
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Working example always beats a text description. –  Loki Astari Jan 17 '11 at 5:32
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If the callback function exists only once, then any thread attempting to callback will also block. This would give me an undesired bug, circa is interesting to ask: can anything in C++ become acting this way? Maybe, due to extern { } or some pointer usage?

No and yes.

callback is a simple function. It can be (in principle) called in parallel by two threads, and extern C changes nothing about this.

However, if the implementation of the callback function eg. waits on a mutex, it can surely block multiple threads.

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It doesn't shares a single mutex-like resource with other parts of code. However, it does waits (doing some operations); see "1. Callback function can block for minutes". Given a simple example, if callback does sleep(3600), does it means, that all threads will be blocked for a hour? –  kagali-san Jan 17 '11 at 0:56
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Yes, but independently of each other, simply because of the fact that all execute sleep(3600). That means, if thread1 executed it at 1:00 and thread2 at 1:30, thread1 will resume at 2:00 and thread2 at 2:30 (save from spurious wakeups which can happen with the sleep function). If the callback would eg. wait on downloading a file, every thread would continue as soon as its file is downloaded, regardless of the status of other threads. –  jpalecek Jan 17 '11 at 1:13
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C++ doesn't know about threads. There is absolutely nothing which would cause one thread to block another automatically; you must use some OS or library functions to accomplish this. It is perfectly valid for any number of threads to call a single function simultaneously.

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If you don't specifically code some sort of lock or call a function (including system functions) that has some sort of lock (like opening the same file for exclusive write access, etc.) then there is no way to "block" other threads. There is no automatic function locking in c or c++.

If the callback executes sleep(3600), that would not block other threads. Each thread would enter the callback and execute sleep(3600).

If you want threads to wait for critical code to execute, you must code the locking mechanism yourself. You generally activate the locking mechanism before executing the code (referred to commonly as "locking") and then you generally deactivate the lock after executing the code ("unlocking"). Linux coders generally use mutexes or gcc atomic operations to do this.

Sounds to me like you need to read some basic documentation about threads and multi threaded code and start from there. Here is one of a million articles on the basics of threading: link text

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