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I get the error:

file.cpp:20: undefined reference to `MyClass::arr'

At this line, I have:

#include "MyClass.hpp"
extern "C" {
void MyClass::func() {
 arr = 0;
}

At header:

class MyClass {
    public:
     static int arr;
     static void func();
}

P.S. gcc (4.x) is called with: -Xlinker -zmuldefs to avoid multiple definition checking.

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1  
Why #include <MyClass.hpp> instead of #include "MyClass.hpp"? Usually <>s indicate library includes. –  Billy ONeal Jan 17 '11 at 0:53
    
Argh, my bad. cleaned up the example. –  kagali-san Jan 17 '11 at 0:58
1  
@David: It's possible for extern "C" to change calling convention as well (for example, if you have the default set to __stdcall on MSVC++, extern "C" will make sure things are using __cdecl instead) –  Billy ONeal Jan 17 '11 at 0:59
    
@Billy: I realized that just after writing the comment, so I deleted the comment before seeing yours. You are right, in that it does have an effect in the calling convention. The next thing to check for me would be whether it is admissible (my gut feeling is that it is not) to declare it without extern "C" and define it with it --the calling convention would not be accessible to translation units that only saw the declaration, and code there would try to call the function with the wrong convention. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 17 '11 at 9:06
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This makes no sense :

#include <MyClass.hpp>
extern "C" {
void MyClass::func() {
 arr = 0;
}

write

#include <MyClass.hpp>

int MyClass::arr = 0; // needs to be instantiated to satisfy linker.

void MyClass::func() 
{
  arr = 0;
}
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1  
+1 -- but the extern "C" is probably required to use func as a pthreads callback function. –  Billy ONeal Jan 17 '11 at 0:52
    
@Billy How is compiler supposed to make MyClass::func extern "C" if such a thing does not exist in C? –  Tomek Jan 17 '11 at 9:21
    
@Tomek: I my albeit limited understanding, it can't. In order to strictly speaking be portable, your thread function cannot be a member function. It doesn't matter on a lot of platforms though because the extern "C" calling convention matches the static calling convention on those machines. –  Billy ONeal Jan 17 '11 at 16:14
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implementation

#include "MyClass.hpp"

 void MyClass::func()
 {
     this->arr = 0;
 }

header file

class MyClass 
{
public:
    static int arr;
    static void func();
}
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1  
error: ‘this’ is unavailable for static member functions –  kagali-san Jan 17 '11 at 0:59
1  
You need extern "C" in there to make the call from pthreads. –  Billy ONeal Jan 17 '11 at 1:00
    
@mhambra & @Billy, you are both right, sorry, my bad. :-/ –  Cesar A. Rivas Jan 17 '11 at 1:02
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Static class fields, after being declared in the class statement, must be also defined in a single .cpp file. In such file you should put:

int MyClass::arr;

By the way, the #include statements have <> brackets only when you're including system headers; for your own headers you should use the usual double quotes ("").

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