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I have the user enter a keyword which is broken up and put into a five by five array, then another function called "getletter" which fills up the rest of the spaces in the array in alphabetical order excluding those letters already included in the keyword. When I try to pass the values of the keyword to the getletter function it doesn't work.

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
#include<cstdlib>
#include<string>
#include<limits>

using namespace std;
string getletter();  
char type[81];
char filename[20];
char key [5];

char f[2] = "q";
    char g[2] = "q";
    char h[2] = "q";
    char i[2] = "q";
    char j[2] = "q";
    char k[2] = "q";
    char l[2] = "q";

int a = 0;
int b = 0;
int c = 0;
int d = 0;
int e = 0;

int main(){



string cipherarray[5][5]= {
{"a","f","k","p","v"},
{"b","g","l","r","w"},
{"c","h","m","s","x"},
{"d","i","n","t","y"},
{"e","j","o","u","z"}

};





cout<<"Enter the name of a file you want to create.\n";

cin>>filename;

cout<<"enter your codeword(codeword can have no repeating letters)\n"; 

cin>>key;

while (key[a] != '\0' ){

while(b <= 4){
cipherarray[b][c] = key[a];

 if (  f == "q" ) {
 cipherarray[b][c] = f;
}

 if ( f != "q" && g == "q"  )
 {
cipherarray[b][c] = g;
}

 if ( g != "q" && h == "q" )
 {
cipherarray[b][c] = h;
}

 if ( h != "q" && i == "q"  )
 {
cipherarray[b][c] = i;
}


 if ( i != "q" && j == "q" ) 
{
cipherarray[b][c] = j;
}

 if ( j != "q" && k == "q" )
 {
cipherarray[b][c] = k;
}

 if ( k != "q" && l == "q" )
 {
cipherarray[b][c] = l;
}
a++;
b++;
if (key[a] == 0)
break; 
}

if (key[a] != 0){
c++;
b = 0;
}
}

while ( c <= 4) {
while ( b <= 4) {
 cipherarray[b][c] = getletter();
 b++;     
}
b = 0;
c++;
} 










b = 0;
c = 0;

while ( c <= 4) {
while ( b <= 4) {
 cout<<cipherarray[b][c]<<" ";
 b++;     
}
cout<<endl;
b = 0;
c++;
} 






 cout<<"now enter some text."<<endl<<"To end this program press Crtl-Z\n";


ofstream outFile;
outFile.open(filename);
outFile<<fixed;
outFile.precision(2);
outFile.setf(ios_base::showpoint);
cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<int>::max(),'\n');

while(!cin.fail()){

 cin.getline(type,81);

outFile<<type<<endl;
}

outFile.close();
}





string getletter() {
string letter;
string cipherarraytemplate[5][5]= {
{"a","f","k","p","v"},
{"b","g","l","r","w"},
{"c","h","m","s","x"},
{"d","i","n","t","y"},
{"e","j","o","u","z"}
};


if (cipherarraytemplate[d][e] == f || cipherarraytemplate[d][e] == g || cipherarraytemplate[d][e] == h || cipherarraytemplate[d][e] == i || cipherarraytemplate[d][e] == j ||
 cipherarraytemplate[d][e] == k || cipherarraytemplate[d][e] == l){ 
 d++; 
 } 
 else {
letter = cipherarraytemplate[d][e];
}
d++;
if (d == 5){
e++;
d = 0;
}
return letter;
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

I think the problem is in the comparisons

if ( j != "q" && k == "q" )

etc. The problem is that these variables are statically-typed as char [2], and so equality comparisons made on them will be comparing the addresses of the arrays and the pointers, not the contents of what's pointed at. To fix this, you might want to change this to read

if ( j != string("q") && k == string("q") )

which uses the string operator== function to do a true deep comparison.

share|improve this answer
    
I shall try although I only understand half of what you are saying... :) –  Edmund Doyle Jan 17 '11 at 1:23
    
I have modified it so all my if statements contain a form of your statement above but it is still not working. Thank's for responding though I now know the problem is with assigning the variables values not passing them. –  Edmund Doyle Jan 17 '11 at 1:34
    
j != "q" will compare two pointers witch never be equal. Faster correct solution is to compare fist char: f[0] != 'q' && g[0] == 'q' . –  Arpegius Jan 17 '11 at 1:36
    
@lionbest- I doubt that this code is performance-critical enough to warrant that. If it is, then using char to hold the values is probably a better option. –  templatetypedef Jan 17 '11 at 1:58

It is not clear why you are using string rather than char for the array entries and the letter variables. E.g.

char f = 'q';
char getletter();  
char cipherarray[5][5]= {
        {'a','f','k','p','v'},
        {'b','g','l','r','w'},
        {'c','h','m','s','x'},
        {'d','i','n','t','y'},
        {'e','j','o','u','z'}

    };

If you change all the string literals to single character literals and so on, you will avoid having to understand pointer semantics for this problem. Expressions such as:

if ( j != 'q' && k == 'q' )

will then just work.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, what puzzles me though is why when i instruct my program to show the value of "j"(using cout<<j[2];) it just shows a bunch of question marks, I would assume that it would either be "q" or another letter, I dont know why it would turn to what I would assume is an undefined value. –  Edmund Doyle Jan 17 '11 at 16:25
    
Also when if i convert string getletter to char getletter it says invalid conersion from const. char to char –  Edmund Doyle Jan 17 '11 at 20:05
    
cout << j[2] returns the third element of the two element character array "j"; i.e. garbage. –  Keith Jan 18 '11 at 23:43
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I just set a variable that increases by one each time the loop runs through.

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