Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a character pointer like this

  char *ptr;

I can allocate values to it like this

  *ptr='a';
  *(ptr+1)='b';

Now when I can do this, why should I use an malloc?

Am I just lucky that this pointer is not referencing an address that is being used by a process? Or are there chances that my data will be corrupted by someother process if I don't use 'malloc'?

share|improve this question
1  
You aren't "allocating" values; you are assigning values to an unallocated memory region. It's undefined behavior (as @SeigeX says) and is extremely dangerous. –  chrisaycock Jan 17 '11 at 2:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Am I just lucky that this pointer is not referencing an address that is being used by a process?

No, you're not lucky. If you were lucky, the program would crash so you know you have a problem. As written, your code is Undefined Behavior. You are writing data through a pointer to unallocated memory.

§ 6.5.6/8
If both the pointer operand and the result point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object, the evaluation shall not produce an overflow; otherwise, the behavior is undefined.

share|improve this answer
    
You are wrong, I must be so damn lucky then :D –  theReverseFlick Jan 17 '11 at 2:30
4  
@Shyam: "Works on my machine" is not a situation where a programmer calls himself lucky, usually ;). –  Matthew Iselin Jan 17 '11 at 2:36
1  
@Shyam we must have different definitions for 'lucky' then. I'd rather know that my code has undefined behavior during development than getting a call on the weekend because it just crashed on one of our customer's systems. –  SiegeX Jan 17 '11 at 2:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.