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     if data.find('!masters') != -1:
         f = open('masters.txt')
         lines = f.readline()
         for line in lines:
               print lines
               sck.send('PRIVMSG ' + chan + " " + str(lines) + '\r\n')
               f.close()

masters.txt has a list of nicknames, how can I print every line from the file at once?. The code I have only prints the first nickname. Your help will be appreciate it. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Should f.close() be outside of the for loop? Also, just for line in open('masters.txt'): should do. –  li.davidm Jan 17 '11 at 3:05
    
umm that doesn't work, it keeps printing out the first line about 5 times –  SourD Jan 17 '11 at 3:07
    
That's because your code only reads one line -- only one call to readline() is made. lines only contains one line (which has a trailing newline on it, BTW). Another problem is that after you print and sck.send() that single line in lines the first time, you close the file so you can't read any more from it if you tried. The for however will try to keep executing for each character in the line though, printing and sck.send()ing that same line over and over until or unless an error occurs. –  martineau Jan 17 '11 at 4:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Firstly, as @l33tnerd said, f.close should be outside the for loop.

Secondly, you are only calling readline once, before the loop. That only reads the first line. The trick is that in Python, files act as iterators, so you can iterate over the file without having to call any methods on it, and that will give you one line per iteration:

 if data.find('!masters') != -1:
     f = open('masters.txt')
     for line in f:
           print line,
           sck.send('PRIVMSG ' + chan + " " + line)
     f.close()

Finally, you were referring to the variable lines inside the loop; I assume you meant to refer to line.

Edit: Oh and you need to indent the contents of the if statement.

share|improve this answer
1  
Also print line should have a comma at the end to avoid double-spacing. –  mgiuca Jan 17 '11 at 3:10
1  
For the same reason, the sck.send() probably doesn't need a '\r\n' at the end. –  martineau Jan 17 '11 at 4:31
    
Oh yes. I forgot to even look at what sck.send was doing. It doesn't really need the str either. So it should just be sck.send('PRIVMSG ' + chan + " " + line), or better still, sck.send("PRIVMSG %d %s" % (chan, line)). –  mgiuca Jan 17 '11 at 8:32
    
Or alternatively, sck.send("PRIVMSG {0} {1}".format(chan, line)). Regardless of which form you prefer, I suggest that you update your answer. –  martineau Jan 17 '11 at 12:46

You probably want something like:

if data.find('!masters') != -1:
     f = open('masters.txt')
     lines = f.read().splitlines()
     f.close()
     for line in lines:
         print line
         sck.send('PRIVMSG ' + chan + " " + str(line) + '\r\n')

Don't close it every iteration of the loop and print line instead of lines. Also use readlines to get all the lines.

EDIT removed my other answer - the other one in this discussion is a better alternative than what I had, so there's no reason to copy it.

Also stripped off the \n with read().splitlines()

share|improve this answer
1  
That will work, but my solution is (usually) better as it won't read the entire file into memory first; it will process each line as it reads it in from the file. The disadvantage of mine is that you can't close the file until you're done. –  mgiuca Jan 17 '11 at 3:11
    
@mgiuca - poster never mentioned anything about the size of the file. The memory won't be an issue if the file is small, which I am assuming a list of nicknames will be. –  NG. Jan 17 '11 at 3:18
1  
Yeah, I just generally think it's good practice not to use O(N) memory if you can get away with using O(1) without too much trouble. –  mgiuca Jan 17 '11 at 3:24
1  
It looks like the code in your answer (and the OP's) isn't taking into account the fact that both readline() and readlines() both retain the trailing newline characters in the line(s) they return. The result will be lots of blank lines being printed and sent. –  martineau Jan 17 '11 at 4:13
2  
@SB: That while loop and the two calls to f.readline make your code look distressingly like Pascal. Just use for line in f –  John Machin Jan 17 '11 at 4:15

You could try this. It doesn't read all of f into memory at once (using the file object's iterator) and it closes the file when the code leaves the with block.

if data.find('!masters') != -1:
    with open('masters.txt', 'r') as f:
        for line in f:
            print line
            sck.send('PRIVMSG ' + chan + " " + line + '\r\n')

If you're using an older version of python (pre 2.6) you'll have to have

from __future__ import with_statement
share|improve this answer

Loop through the file.

f = open("masters.txt")
lines = f.readlines()
for line in lines:
    print line
share|improve this answer

Did you try

for line in open("masters", "r").readlines(): print line

?

readline() 

only reads "a line", on the other hand

readlines()

reads whole lines and gives you a list of all lines.

share|improve this answer
1  
You can get rid of the readlines() call altogether. –  wheaties Jan 17 '11 at 3:58
    
More importantly readlines() reads the entire file into memory with each line will and its trailing newline intact, so the print line will output two of them. The for line in open() text file reading coding style also leaves the file open after the loop finishes since there's no way to refer to it again and close() it. –  martineau Jan 17 '11 at 13:04
    
hmm, didn't know that.. Thanks for the comments ;) –  Serdar Dalgic Jan 18 '11 at 1:11

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