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For example if I made a file with grep that give me a next result:

16 Jan 07:18:42 (name1), xx.210.49.xx),
16 Jan 07:19:14 (name2), xx.210.xx.24),
16 Jan 07:19:17 (name3), xx.140.xxx.79),
16 Jan 07:19:44 (name4), xx.210.49.xx),
16 Jan 07:19:56 (name5), xx.140.xxx.79),

,then how to sed awk or grep to remove all except date name and IP to look like this:

16 Jan 07:18:42 name1 xx.210.49.xx
16 Jan 07:19:14 name2 xx.210.xx.24
16 Jan 07:19:17 name3 xx.140.xxx.79
16 Jan 07:19:44 name4 xx.210.49.xx
16 Jan 07:19:56 name5 xx.140.xxx.79

My grep command look like this:

grep 'double' $DAEMON | awk -F" " '{print $2" "$1" "$3" "$8" "$10}'  > $DBLOG

Thx.

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\ is your friend –  Michael Dorgan Jan 17 '11 at 3:31
    
If you weren't manipulating fields too, sed would definitely be the easy way to go. sed -n '/double/s/foo/bar/p' <file> will print all lines from <file> containing double with foo changed to bar. –  Jefromi Jan 17 '11 at 4:59
    
It's usually not necessary to set the field separator to a space since the default includes that. You can do awk '{print $2, $1, $3, $8, $10}' plus adding the other things such as /double/ and gsub(). –  Dennis Williamson Jan 17 '11 at 6:47

5 Answers 5

If you just want to strip certain characters, you might want to look at the tr command with the -d option:

$ echo "16 Jan 07:18:42 (name1), xx.210.49.xx)," | tr -d "(),*'[]"
16 Jan 07:18:42 name1 xx.210.49.xx
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you can do it with just one awk command. no need to use grep

awk '/double/{gsub("[(),]","",$8); gsub("[(),]","",$10);print $2" "$1" "$3" "$8" "$10}'

or just

awk '/double/{gsub("[(),]","");print $2" "$1" "$3" "$8" "$10}'

if you need to remove [] as well, then use this pattern: gsub("[][(),]","")

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What to said, except THANKS for experts! :) –  easyyu Jan 17 '11 at 3:44

Breaking down ghostdog74's answer:

awk '
    /double/ {
        gsub(/[(),\[\]]/, "")
        print $2" "$1" "$3" "$8" "$10
    }
'

/double/ tells awk to only perform the stuff in { } for lines that contain double (/double/ is a regular expression).

gsub expects the first argument to be a regular expression, the second argument to be a substitution string, and the third argument to be the variable that the substitution is being performed on. If the third argument is not specified (as in this case) it defaults to $0 which matches the entire line.

I added \[ and \] to the regular expression which should match [ and ] characters in addition to (, ) and ,.

In general whenever you find yourself combining awk, sed or grep, there is almost always a way to do what you need with just sed or just awk.

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1  
don't have to escape if you do this: gsub("[][(),]","") –  ghostdog74 Jan 17 '11 at 4:08

With sed

$> cat ./text | sed -r -e 's/(\(|\)\,)//g'
16 Jan 07:18:42 name1 xx.210.49.xx
16 Jan 07:19:14 name2 xx.210.xx.24
16 Jan 07:19:17 name3 xx.140.xxx.79
16 Jan 07:19:44 name4 xx.210.49.xx
16 Jan 07:19:56 name5 xx.140.xxx.79

Inb4 UselesUseOfCat: cat ./text here is similar for OP's grep output.

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[jaypal@MBP-13~/temp] cat file1
16 Jan 07:18:42 (name1), xx.210.49.xx),
16 Jan 07:19:14 (name2), xx.210.xx.24),
16 Jan 07:19:17 (name3), xx.140.xxx.79),
16 Jan 07:19:44 (name4), xx.210.49.xx),
16 Jan 07:19:56 (name5), xx.140.xxx.79),

[jaypal@MBP-13~/temp] sed 's/\(.*[^(]\)(\(.*\)),\(.*\)),/\1\2\3/g' file1
16 Jan 07:18:42 name1 xx.210.49.xx
16 Jan 07:19:14 name2 xx.210.xx.24
16 Jan 07:19:17 name3 xx.140.xxx.79
16 Jan 07:19:44 name4 xx.210.49.xx
16 Jan 07:19:56 name5 xx.140.xxx.79
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