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I'm pondering the best method to handle Users and Accounts for a website.

Every User belongs to a single Account, Accounts can have multiple Users. The tables will be MyISAM so there is no DB-enforced referential integrity. Each User will have permission to view/add/edit their own content and/or the content of all Users for the Account they are under.

CREATE TABLE account (
id INT,
name VARCHAR,
... etc
);

CREATE TABLE user (
id INT,
accountId INT, // references account.id
userName,
etc.
);

Pretty much every other table in the DB will reference the User table. Eg.

CREATE TABLE product (
id INT,
userId, // references user.id
name VARCHAR,
details TEXT
.. more stuff
);

CREATE TABLE event (
id INT,
userId INT,
name VARCHAR,
date DATETIME,
..etc
);

So to get products a User can access assuming the have permission to access just their own it's:

SELECT * FROM product WHERE userId = 17;

To get products a User can access when they have access to the entire account is:

SELECT p.* FROM product p, user u WHERE u.accountId = 3;

Now, the question is: Would it be better to have an accountId field in product, event etc. as well?

CREATE TABLE product (
id INT,
userId, // references user.id
accountId, // references account.id
name VARCHAR,
details TEXT
.. more stuff
);

This would remove the need for the extra join on just about every query used:

SELECT p.* FROM product p.accountId = 3;

The Users will never move from one Account to another so the accountId will always be correct. Is it worth the additonal data storage requirments and losing a bit of normalisation to remove these joins from the 100s of other queries that the site will use? One other thing to consider is that the user table will not be written to all that often so it's unlikely there will be issues around table locking while doing the joins.

share|improve this question
    
How bad would it be if a code flaw made a product belong to user A and group B, but user A isn't in group B? – Marc B Jan 17 '11 at 4:17
    
What is the read to write ration for the product table? – The Scrum Meister Jan 17 '11 at 4:17
    
It could be pretty bad in particular instances if something belonged to a User and an unrelated Account.. – fred Jan 17 '11 at 7:39
    
I'm not sure what the ratio will be but reading will be much more frequent. Probably in the realm of at least 1000:1 reads to writes. – fred Jan 17 '11 at 7:41

Probably not. I think its a waist storing the extra field in every row, and if your tables are indexed properly, Joining them will not be that expensive.

Try adding a index on the user table, to include both the userid and the accountid fields, since your table is MyISAM, that will remove the need to lookup the accountid in the table data.

Also, your query SELECT p.* FROM product p, user u WHERE u.accountId = 3; is performing a OUTER join, which should be changed to

SELECT p.*
FROM product p JOIN user u ON p.userid = u.id
WHERE u.accountId = 3;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your comments. I've already got the indexes there, was just wondering if I'm going about this the wrong way. – fred Jan 17 '11 at 8:07
    
@fred You already got the composite index there? – The Scrum Meister Jan 17 '11 at 17:39
    
Actually no, not a composite key. What's the benefits in this situation? I'll need an accountid index anyway for other lookups. – fred Jan 17 '11 at 23:15
    
@fred Create a additional index that includes both fields. read dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/multiple-column-indexes.html – The Scrum Meister Jan 17 '11 at 23:40

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