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I've got a situation where I have several classes that have somethings in common and somethings unique. I'd like to create a class that is more strongly typed than object[] but could hold any of these other classes.

If I have for example:

class MyType1
{
   string common1;
   string common2;
   string type1unique1;
   string type1unique2;

   //Constructors Here 
}

class MyType2
{
   string common1;
   string common2;
   string type2unique1;
   string type2unique2;

   //Constructors Here 
}

I'd like to create a class something like:

class MyObject
{
   string common1;
   string common2;

   //Code Here 
}

So that I create something like:

Dictionary<int, MyObject>

That would hold either MyType1 or MyType2 but not string or int or anything else a dictionary would hold. The MyObjects that are stored there would need to be able to be recast to MyType1 or MyType2 later to access the unique attributes underneath.

Also it would be really great if I could access MyObject.common1 or MyObject.common2 without recasting it.

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2  
Sounds like a fine plan, but you didn't exactly ask a question. –  Eric Mickelsen Jan 17 '11 at 5:41
    
What's wrong with standard inheritance? –  Cameron Jan 17 '11 at 5:42
1  
there are many questions already covering this on StackOverflow, for example check this search. Take 10 minutes to go through and read a selection of those questions. –  slugster Jan 17 '11 at 6:14
    
Nothing wrong just never done this exact procedure before normally all my custom classes are completely unique. And thanks for the Search I couldn't find the right keyword to do my search. –  Josh Jan 17 '11 at 6:32
    
Then you are not using the most powerful feature of OOP - polymorphism. Which is a tad odd.... –  Aaron Gage Jan 17 '11 at 8:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted
public abstract class MyObject {
 protected string common1; 
 protected string common2;
}

public class MyType1 : MyObject {
 string type1unique1; 
 string type1unique2;
}

public class MyType2 : MyObject {
 string type2unique1; 
 string type2unique2;
}

IDictionary<int, MyObject> objects = new Dictionary<int, MyObject>();
objects[1] = new MyType1();
objects[1].common1
if(objects[1] is MyType1) {
    ((MyType1)objects[1]).type1unique1
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just to add to this answer.... consider naming MyObject something like MyBaseObject and also consider making it abstract. –  slugster Jan 17 '11 at 6:12

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