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My little program below shall take 5 numbers from the user, store them into an array of integers and use a function to print them out. Sincerly it doesn't work and nothing is printed out. I can't find a mistake, so i would be glad about any advice. Thanks.

#include <stdio.h>


void printarray(int intarray[], int n)

{
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i < n; i ++)
    {
        printf("%d", intarray[i]);
    }
}

int main ()

{
    const int n = 5;
    int temp = 0;
    int i;
    int intarray [n];
    char check;

    printf("Please type in your numbers!\n");

    for(i = 0; i < n; i ++)
    {
        printf("");
            scanf("%d", &temp);         
        intarray[i] = temp;

    }

    printf("Do you want to print them out? (yes/no): ");
        scanf("%c", &check);

        if (check == 'y')
            printarray(intarray, n);

    getchar();
    getchar();
    getchar();
    getchar();
    return 0;
}
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2  
The first thing your program does is a printf, so if it doesn't print anything out you are probably not running the correct program. You should make sure you are actually running your compiled code! –  Gabe Jan 17 '11 at 5:47
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Change to that:

char check[2];

And also that:

scanf("%s", check);
if (!strcmp(check,"y"))
    printarray(intarray, n);

Hope that helped. Your scanf("%c", &check); failed. Instead of y you end up having NL (ASCII code 10), which means the if part fails.

I don't know if it a nice fix though. Maybe someone could give a better one. Keep in mind if you input something bigger (eg yess) you going to get a bit unlucky ;)

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This worked for me. Thanks. –  chrisaycock Jan 17 '11 at 6:02
2  
... and end up with serious problems if someone enters more than 1 character!!! If you want to go that way, make it scanf("%1s", check). But in any case the original scanf variant should work as well. Why you are saying that it "failed" is not clear to me. What failed? –  AndreyT Jan 17 '11 at 6:04
    
@AndreyT, I don't really know, when I tried running the program, when I input 'y' it just jumped over. I guess that it got replaced with a '\0' or something. –  Muggen Jan 17 '11 at 6:06
3  
It happens because %c specifier does not skip whitespace. So, Muggen is right (and I'm wrong). scanf is indeed failing. In order to make the original variant work one can explicitly ask scanf to skip whitespace by doing scanf(" %c", &check) (note the extra space). –  AndreyT Jan 17 '11 at 6:15
1  
@AndreyT: Amazing. It works by just adding the extra space. –  Ordo Jan 17 '11 at 6:16
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Change your output in printarray() to read:

    printf("%d\n", intarray[i]);

              ^^

That will add a newline after each number.

Normally, output written to the console in C is buffered until a complete line is output. Your printarray() function does not write any newlines, so the output is buffered until you do print one. However, you wait for input from the user before printing a newline.

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Thank you very much. Sincerly I don't unterstand the problem. Normally I can use printf() without adding a newline character in it. Why is it different here? –  Ordo Jan 17 '11 at 5:56
2  
Are you able to run his program? Even with flushing, I can't get an output either using gcc on Mac OS X. –  chrisaycock Jan 17 '11 at 5:56
    
Well i tried it out now and it still doesn't work even with a "\n" in the printf(). –  Ordo Jan 17 '11 at 5:58
3  
@Ordo Running through gdb, it seems that the last scanf() is picking-up the \n that was intended for the list of integers. That is, check is \n. –  chrisaycock Jan 17 '11 at 6:00
    
This is why you don't use scanf() - it is too weird in the way it works! The best 'solution' would be to read a string with scanf("%1s", check);, but you'd need char check[2]; as the variable. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 17 '11 at 6:50
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Aside from the suggestions about printing the \n character after your array (which are correct), you also have to be careful with your scanf that expects the "yes/no" answer. Muggen was the first one to notice this (see his answer).

You used a %c specified in your scanf. %c specifier in scanf does not skip whitespace, which means that this scanf will read whatever whitespace was left in the input buffer after you entered your array. You hit the "Enter" key after entering the array, which put a newline character into the input buffer. After that scanf("%c", &check) will immediately read that pending newline character instead of waiting for you to enter "yes" or "no". That's another reason your code does not print anything.

In order to fix your scanf, you have to force it to skip all whitespace characters before reading the actual answer. You can do that by scanf(" %c", &check). Note the extra space before %c. Space character in scanf format string forces it to skip all continuous whitespace beginning from the current reading position. Newline character happens to be whitespace, so it will be ignored by this scanf.

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+1 for scanf(" %c", &check) –  Muggen Jan 17 '11 at 6:20
1  
Thank's for the explanation. I think it's fair to accept Muggen's answer since he found the problem first and gave a solution. But your solution is definetly smarter :) –  Ordo Jan 17 '11 at 6:24
    
@Ordo, and probably safer as well. –  Muggen Jan 17 '11 at 6:26
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printf("%d", intarray[i]); 

add new line after this

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