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Still trying to answer this question, and I think I finally found a solution, but it runs too slow.

var $div = $('<div>')
    .css({ 'border': '1px solid red', 'position': 'absolute', 'z-index': '65535' })
    .appendTo('body');

$('body *').live('mousemove', function(e) {
    var topElement = null;
    $('body *').each(function() {
        if(this == $div[0]) return true;
        var $elem = $(this);
        var pos = $elem.offset();
        var width = $elem.width();
        var height = $elem.height();
        if(e.pageX > pos.left && e.pageY > pos.top
            && e.pageX < (pos.left + width) && e.pageY < (pos.top + height)) {
            var zIndex = document.defaultView.getComputedStyle(this, null).getPropertyValue('z-index');
            if(zIndex == 'auto') zIndex = $elem.parents().length;
            if(topElement == null || zIndex > topElement.zIndex) {
                topElement = {
                    'node': $elem,
                    'zIndex': zIndex
                };
            }

        }
    });
    if(topElement != null ) {
        var $elem = topElement.node;
        $div.offset($elem.offset()).width($elem.width()).height($elem.height());
    }
});

It basically loops through all the elements on the page and finds the top-most element beneath the cursor.

Is there maybe some way I could use a quad-tree or something and segment the page so the loop runs faster?

share|improve this question
    
$(this).closest('body>*') should give you the top-most ancestor of this, is this what you want? or is your layout such that elements are not always inside their ancestor? –  tobyodavies Jan 17 '11 at 7:55
2  
Is there any reason that you can't just use e.currentTarget instead of looping to find the element? –  Guffa Jan 17 '11 at 8:01
    
@toby: It's for a Chrome extension. Could be run on any page. Don't know what the markup will look like. By "top-most" I mean has the highest z-index... there could be less deeply nested elements that are styled to appear above others. –  Mark Jan 17 '11 at 8:02
    
@Guffa: Yes, the currentTarget will always be the $div because I'm moving it overtop of the element to highlight it, but then it steals all the mouse events. –  Mark Jan 17 '11 at 8:03
1  
The biggest bottleneck isn't the looping part, it's computing the offset and dimensions. Focus your attention there. One small optimisation is to not bother calculating the width and height if the offset is greater than the current mouse position. –  Box9 Jan 17 '11 at 8:41
show 4 more comments

2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Is there maybe some way I could use a quad-tree or something and segment the page so the loop runs faster?

Just step back a bit, realize how small the problem is, and that the harder your try the more complicated answer you will use.

Now what you need to do is to create 4 elements for the highlighting. They will form an empty square, and so your mouse events are free to fire. This is similar to this overlay example I've made.

The difference is that you only need the four elements (no resize markers), and that the size and position of the 4 boxes are a bit different (to mimick the red border). Then you can use event.target in your event handler, because it gets the real topmost element by default.

Another approach is to hide the exra element, get elementFromPoint, calculate then put it back.

They're faster than light, I can tell you. Even Einstein would agree :)

1.) The easy & nice - [Demo1] (overlay or borders) FF needs v3.0+

var box = $("<div class='outer' />").css({
  display: "none", position: "absolute", 
  zIndex: 65000, background:"rgba(255, 0, 0, .3)"
}) .appendTo("body");

var last = +new Date;
$("body").mousemove(function(e){
    var offset, el = e.target;
    var now = +new Date;
    if (now-last < 25) 
      return;
    last = now;
    if (el === document.body) {
        box.hide(); 
        return;
    } else if (el.className === "outer") {
        box.hide();
        el = document.elementFromPoint(e.clientX, e.clientY);
    }
    el = $(el);
    offset = el.offset();
    box.css({
        width:  el.outerWidth()  - 1, 
        height: el.outerHeight() - 1, 
        left:   offset.left, 
        top:    offset.top 
    });
    box.show();   
});​

2.) The fast & robust - [Demo2] (only supports borders)

var box = new Overlay();

$("body").mouseover(function(e){
  var el = $(e.target);
  var offset = el.offset();
  box.render(el.outerWidth(), el.outerHeight(), offset.left, offset.top);
});​

/**
 * This object encapsulates the elements and actions of the overlay.
 */
function Overlay(width, height, left, top) {

    this.width = this.height = this.left = this.top = 0;

    // outer parent
    var outer = $("<div class='outer' />").appendTo("body");

    // red lines (boxes)
    var topbox    = $("<div />").css("height", 1).appendTo(outer);
    var bottombox = $("<div />").css("height", 1).appendTo(outer);  
    var leftbox   = $("<div />").css("width",  1).appendTo(outer);
    var rightbox  = $("<div />").css("width",  1).appendTo(outer);

    // don't count it as a real element
    outer.mouseover(function(){ 
        outer.hide(); 
    });    

    /**
     * Public interface
     */

    this.resize = function resize(width, height, left, top) {
      if (width != null)
        this.width = width;
      if (height != null)
        this.height = height;
      if (left != null)
        this.left = left;
      if (top != null)
        this.top = top;      
    };

    this.show = function show() {
       outer.show();
    };

    this.hide = function hide() {
       outer.hide();
    };     

    this.render = function render(width, height, left, top) {

        this.resize(width, height, left, top);

        topbox.css({
          top:   this.top,
          left:  this.left,
          width: this.width
        });
        bottombox.css({
          top:   this.top + this.height - 1,
          left:  this.left,
          width: this.width
        });
        leftbox.css({
          top:    this.top, 
          left:   this.left, 
          height: this.height
        });
        rightbox.css({
          top:    this.top, 
          left:   this.left + this.width - 1, 
          height: this.height  
        });

        this.show();
    };      

    // initial rendering [optional]
    // this.render(width, height, left, top);
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's what someone suggested in the other thread too. I actually wanted a semi-transparent red rectangle overlayed... must have changed the styling before I posted this. But anyway, wouldn't this glitch up as you mouse over the borders still? –  Mark Jan 17 '11 at 17:50
    
Just remove/hide the empty square onmouseover, then the next mouse movement triggers the correct element. It will be unnoticable for the user. Let me do a demo for you... –  galambalazs Jan 17 '11 at 18:06
1  
What's the + before new do though? Never seen that before. –  Mark Jan 23 '11 at 18:42
2  
@Mark, I was curious too: What does the plus sign do in 'return +new date'? –  John Leehey Apr 17 '12 at 23:23
1  
Generally speaking the prefix operator + converts to number. Check alert(typeof "52") vs alert(typeof +"52") –  galambalazs Apr 18 '12 at 22:38
show 5 more comments

First off, i don't think doing $('body *').live is a very good idea, it seems very expensive (think about the kind of calculation the browser has to do every time you move your mouse)

That said, here is an optimized version that ignores that aspect

var $div = $('<div>')
    .css({ 'border': '1px solid red', 'position': 'absolute', 'z-index': '65535' })
    .appendTo('body');

$('body *').live('mousemove', function(e) {
    var topElement = null;
    var $bodyStar = $('body *');
    for(var i=0,elem;elem=$bodyStar[i];i++) {
        if(elem == $div[0]) continue;
        var $elem = $(elem);
        var pos = $elem.offset();
        var width = $elem.width();
        var height = $elem.height();
        if(e.pageX > pos.left && e.pageY > pos.top && e.pageX < (pos.left + width) && e.pageY < (pos.top + height)) {
            var zIndex = document.defaultView.getComputedStyle(this, null).getPropertyValue('z-index');
            if(zIndex == 'auto') zIndex = $elem.parents().length;
            if(topElement == null || zIndex > topElement.zIndex) {
                topElement = {
                    'node': $elem,
                    'zIndex': zIndex
                };
            }

        }
    }
    if(topElement != null) {
        var $elem = topElement.node;
        $div.offset($elem.offset()).width($elem.width()).height($elem.height());
    }
});

For future reference, never use jQuerys looping mechanisms if you need performance. They are all build around function calls for every iteration, which is very slow compared to a normal loop, since the call stack initiation that happens when you do a function call is a huge overhead for most iteration operations you need to do.

Code updated to fix errors, and allow for dynamically inserted elements.

share|improve this answer
    
First of all, it's better to use addClass() than .css(). Second, may I ask when will your for loop end looping? –  Reigel Jan 17 '11 at 8:10
2  
It will end when $bodystar[i] retruns undefined, which it will do when i reaches the length of the array. It is the most efficient way to loop over an array you know doesn't contain values that will evaluate to false –  Martin Jespersen Jan 17 '11 at 8:11
    
actually using while(i--) is faster but thats a whole different ballgame :) –  Martin Jespersen Jan 17 '11 at 8:12
1  
Also, I don't think pulling bodyStar out like that helps any. The loop condition might be a slight improvement over .each (if implemented correctly), but... ultimately we're still looping over every element on the page, and I think that's the killer. Maybe caching some of the computed properties would help.... –  Mark Jan 17 '11 at 8:20
1  
The loop condition is a huge improvement, over each - run some test and you will see :) .each/filter/map etc possible the single slowest aspect of jquery. Do some testing on the subject and you will see, i have done tons of performancetest in browsers from ie7 and up, including chrome,safari,opera &firefox and the difference between using regular loops and function based loops is simply staggering... but hey, you can always disregard the advice, it is free after all :) –  Martin Jespersen Jan 17 '11 at 8:26
show 8 more comments

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