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I am looking at some c++ code and do not understand the purpose of the template declaration in this situation:

template<> void operator>>(const ClassA& s, const ClassB d) {...}

What is the semantic of template<>?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

This is, indeed, template specialization, as others before mentioned. There must be some previously declared function template, such as:

template<typename T, typename U>
void operator>>(const T& s, const U d) {...}

However, it is quite misguided. It is much better to remove the template<> altogether, so operator>> would just be overloaded. The problem with function template specialization is that it may lead to unexpected behaviour in the presence of overloaded functions (and operator>> has lots of overloads), since the specialization does not overload. This means that the compiler first selects the most appropriate overload for the function and then, if the selected overload is a function template, it looks for template specializations to see if there is an appropriate one.

A classical example (unfortunately, I don't remember where I read it). Consider this overloaded function template:

template <typename T>
void Function(T param);

template <typename T>
void Function(T* param);

template <>
void Function(int* param);

main()
{
  int i = 5;
  Function(&i);
}

As expected, the template specialization for int* is called. But just change the order of the function definitions:

template <typename T>
void Function(T param);

template <>
void Function(int* param);

template <typename T>
void Function(T* param);

main()
{
  int i = 5;
  Function(&i);
}

Now the general template for T* is called, since we are specializing the template for T, not for T*, and this second template is better suited for our call. This would be avoided if we overloaded the function instead of specializing the template:

void Function(int* param);

Now the order of declaration does not matter, we will always call the overload for int*.

UPDATE: Now I know who to credit. I read about this in an article by Herb Sutter. The example was provided by Peter Dimov and Dave Abrahams.

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Thanks for you reply, so this is yet an other trick that complicate the language. Like overload I don't think that this is a good idea see: gbracha.blogspot.com/2009/09/systemic-overload.html –  mathk Jan 17 '11 at 13:57
    
@mathk: I disagree with most ideas in the article you link. –  Gorpik Jan 17 '11 at 15:55
    
you disagree with one of th guy that design Java. What do you dislike? –  mathk Jan 19 '11 at 9:02
    
@mathk: He seems to disagree with himself too, because Java allows all these things he critisizes (such as constructors and function overloading). –  Gorpik Jan 19 '11 at 11:28
    
that put him in the right spot to really know why it is not a good idea. –  mathk Jan 19 '11 at 11:31

This is Template specialization

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You use this syntax when you want to provide a special handler for a particular template type. Consider:

// A normal template definition.
template <typename AType>
whoami () {   std::cout << "I am an unknown type.";  }

// Now we specialize.
template <>
whoami<int> () {   std::cout << "I am an integer!";  }

There's some other nonsense involved, particularly "partial specialization", but that's the basic function of template <>.

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It is a template specialization: (fully or partially) resolving the template for a specific type. (Your particular example seems to be a full specialization, as no more template parameters are left unresolved in it. If the template has multiple parameters, and you specialize only some of them, it is called partial template specialization)

This allows one to provide type-specific optimizations for a given template, or to do many clever tricks such as detecting the static type of variables etc.

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1  
éter I don't think the example presented by the OP is valid. If I recall correctly, you can't specialize a function, you have to overload it. Specialization only works for classes. –  greatwolf Jan 17 '11 at 9:15
1  
@Victor, template functions do have some limitations compared to class templates; dunno how (and whether is) this changed C++03 and later though. However, the linked examples in C++ FAQ seem to be function template specializations so I presume it should work :-) –  Péter Török Jan 17 '11 at 9:19
2  
éter hmm interesting, I just tried it on a few compilers and it does indeed accept the code. It looks like partial specialization doesn't work on function however. That must be what I was thinking of. –  greatwolf Jan 17 '11 at 9:24
1  
@Victor T: That's it, partial function template specialization is invalid, but full specialization is accepted. Nevertheless, specializing a function template is seldom a good idea (I have tried to explain that in my answer). –  Gorpik Jan 17 '11 at 9:34
1  
@Victor: Partial specialization isn't available for functions in C++03, but full specialization is fine. –  Fred Nurk Jan 17 '11 at 9:35

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