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I'm currently writing an SQL statement which outputs the details of a delivery for a customer, into a nice repeater grid. However, based on a field in the customers table (with an integer determing how many rows), i need to be able to generate that many rows with the exact same details in them.

I.E: A delivery has one row, but based on the number in the customers table for that customer, the same row needs to be outputted that many times in the SQL.

Any ideas? Sorry if it's a bit confusing, and I know it sounds stupid, but from the SQL 'labels' are being generated for that delivery, and multiple labels may be required.

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1  
Can you cite some sample records from different tables (Customers and delivery) and also show some sample required output? –  Sachin Shanbhag Jan 17 '11 at 12:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Extended answer from AdaTheDev. Using a CTE to create the number table.

with Numbers(Num)
as
(
    select 1 as Num
    union all
    select (Num + 1) as Num
    from Numbers
    where Num < 1000
)
select t1.*
from @T1 t1
    join @T2 t2 on t1.ID = t2.ID
    join Numbers n on t2.RowCnt >= n.Num option(maxrecursion 1000)
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That's a wonderfully elegant example of CTEs' recursive use. You see mention of it all the time, but I've seen it illustrated so well or so clearly. I'm curious though, how is the performance on a recursive CTE? –  eidylon Jan 17 '11 at 15:26
1  
Here is an article about CTE performance from 2007. sqlservercentral.com/articles/T-SQL/2926 –  Mikael Eriksson Jan 17 '11 at 17:15
    
Thanks for that link. So it sounds like it's a feature you'd want to stay away from though unless absolutely necessary. Still cool. –  eidylon Jan 18 '11 at 7:39

Here's one way, making use of a "Numbers" table which you can just create and populate with numbers from 1 to n (one-off process)

SELECT d.*
FROM Delivery d
    JOIN Customer c ON d.CustomerID = c.ID
    JOIN @Numbers n ON c.NumberField >= n.Num

e.g. basic example

DECLARE @T1 TABLE (ID INTEGER)
DECLARE @T2 TABLE (ID INTEGER, RowCnt INTEGER)
INSERT @T1 VALUES (1)
INSERT @T1 VALUES (2)
INSERT @T1 VALUES (3)
INSERT @T1 VALUES (4)
INSERT @T2 VALUES (1,1)
INSERT @T2 VALUES (2,2)
INSERT @T2 VALUES (3,4)

DECLARE @Numbers TABLE (Num INTEGER)
INSERT @Numbers VALUES(1)
INSERT @Numbers VALUES(2)
INSERT @Numbers VALUES(3)
INSERT @Numbers VALUES(4)
INSERT @Numbers VALUES(5)

SELECT t1.*
FROM @T1 t1
    JOIN @T2 t2 ON t1.ID = t2.ID
    JOIN @Numbers n ON t2.RowCnt >= n.Num

UPDATE
If you don't want to create a physical numbers table, you can (for numbers 1-2048) use spt_values like this:

SELECT t1.*
FROM @T1 t1
    JOIN @T2 t2 ON t1.ID = t2.ID
    JOIN spt_values n ON t2.RowCnt >= n.Num AND n.type='P'
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neat idea! ..... –  fearofawhackplanet Jan 17 '11 at 12:37
    
Thanks, seems like a great idea - but at the moment I'd like to avoid modifying the database if I can, but that's certainly one I'll discuss with my manager. –  Chris Jan 17 '11 at 12:52
    
You can create the numbers table in your query using cte –  Mikael Eriksson Jan 17 '11 at 13:39

I think what would work well here is a recursive CTE. In my example I make table variables with some sample data that are only useful for demonstration. The part from DECLARE @RepeatedLevel = 3; and onwards is the query itself.

-- Sample table variables are purely for demonstration.
DECLARE @Customer TABLE
(
    ID INT IDENTITY(1,1)
    , Name VARCHAR(25)
)

DECLARE @Delivery TABLE
(
    ID INT IDENTITY(1,1)
    , CustomerID INT
    , DeliveryDate DATE
);

INSERT INTO @Customer
VALUES ('Jeremy'), ('Chris'), ('Sachin'), ('AdaTheDev');

INSERT INTO @Delivery
VALUES (1, '20100602')
    , (2, '20100726')
    , (2, '20110103')
    , (3, '20090401')
    , (3, '20100214')
    , (3, '20100726')
    , (4, '20100713')
    , (4, '20100719')
    , (4, '20100813')
    , (4, '20101028');

DECLARE @RepeatedLevel INT = 3;

WITH DeliverysRepeated AS
(
    SELECT
        Customer.Name
        , Delivery.DeliveryDate
        , 1 AS RecursionLevel
    FROM @Customer Customer
    INNER JOIN @Delivery Delivery
        ON Delivery.CustomerID = Customer.ID

    UNION ALL

    SELECT
        DeliverysRepeated.Name
        , DeliverysRepeated.DeliveryDate
        , DeliverysRepeated.RecursionLevel + 1 AS RecursionLevel
    FROM DeliverysRepeated 
    WHERE DeliverysRepeated.RecursionLevel < @RepeatedLevel
)
SELECT
    DeliverysRepeated.Name
    , DeliverysRepeated.DeliveryDate
FROM DeliverysRepeated
ORDER BY Name, DeliveryDate DESC
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I had read Ada's answer but not Mikael Eriksson's when I posted. Theirs is basically the same answer: "Use a recursive CTE" with a more general example and hours before mine. I'll leave this answer up as another example, but I wanted to point that he answered it first. ^^ –  Jeremy Pridemore Jan 18 '11 at 2:04

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