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I'm trying to write a basic vertex shader in GLSL and just for the sake of clarity, I'd like to add some functions to create matrices and perform other simple operations outside of the main() loop.

However, when I try to execute:

uniform float scale;

void main()
{
vec4 pos = gl_ProjectionMatrix * gl_Vertex;
pos *= scaleMatrix(scale);

gl_Position = pos;

gl_TexCoord[0] = gl_MultiTexCoord0;

gl_FrontColor = gl_Color;           
} 

mat4 scaleMatrix(const in float s) {
return mat4(s, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0,
            0.0, s, 0.0, 0.0,
            0.0, 0.0, s, 0.0,
            0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0 );
}

I get the error: error C1008: undefined variable "scaleMatrix". However

uniform float scale;

void main()
{
vec4 pos = gl_ProjectionMatrix * gl_Vertex;
pos *= mat4(s, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0,
            0.0, s, 0.0, 0.0,
            0.0, 0.0, s, 0.0,
            0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 1.0 );

gl_Position = pos;

gl_TexCoord[0] = gl_MultiTexCoord0;

gl_FrontColor = gl_Color;           
} 

works just fine. Can anyone shed some light on this for me?

share|improve this question
1  
You should not really do computations of matrices you could pass as uniforms in the shader. Good compilers may optimize it out, but it's ugly nevertheless. It's best practice to compute only those things that are influenced by a varying/attribute/in. Whatever can be passed as uniforms should be passed by uniform. –  datenwolf Nov 12 '11 at 1:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try to put your function declaration at the top of your code file.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! That has indeed fixed it. This seems a little silly to me but I guess there's a good reason you have to do it this way. –  Chris Robinson Jan 17 '11 at 13:10
    
Yep, you need to put prototypes, or definitions above the evocation. E.g. move your scaleMatrix to the top of the file before main() –  EnabrenTane Jan 17 '11 at 13:10
    
@Chris Robinson yeah, its for parsing reasons. This is how the world of C is. –  EnabrenTane Jan 17 '11 at 13:11
    
Thanks guys. I've been using Java for so long that I'm embarrassed to say this had slipped my mind... :p –  Chris Robinson Jan 17 '11 at 13:15

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