Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have created a small scale CMS for a website I am working on and have a form that uploads image files to be used on the website. It uploads the files successfully but the permissions it sets do not allow the file to be viewed in a browser.

Here is my current PHP code to upload the files

$typepath = $_POST['filetype'];

$target_path = "../../images/uploads/".$typepath."/";

$target_path = $target_path . basename( $_FILES['uploadedfile']['name']); 

if(move_uploaded_file($_FILES['uploadedfile']['tmp_name'], $target_path)) {
    echo "<p>The file ".  basename( $_FILES['uploadedfile']['name']). 
    " has been uploaded</p>\n<p>To the directory:  <span style=\"font-weight:bold;\">".substr($target_path, 6)."</span></p>";
} else{
    echo "There was an error uploading the file, please try again!";
}
share|improve this question
    
Browser has nothing to do with file permissions. Can you please tell more real story, preferably with copy-pasted error messages? Thanks –  Your Common Sense Jan 17 '11 at 15:27
    
@Col. Shrapnel - yes it does. If the file doesn't have read permissions on the server, then the browser will get a 401 not authorised error. –  Spudley Jan 17 '11 at 15:31
1  
@Spudley it's 403. And it's still server issue, not browser one. –  Your Common Sense Jan 17 '11 at 15:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

PHP Manaual chmod http://php.net/manual/en/function.chmod.php

chmod("/somedir/somefile", 0755);

In context;

$typepath = $_POST['filetype'];

$target_path = "../../images/uploads/".$typepath."/";

$target_path = $target_path . basename( $_FILES['uploadedfile']['name']); 

if(move_uploaded_file($_FILES['uploadedfile']['tmp_name'], $target_path)) {
    chmod($target_path, 0755);
    echo "<p>The file ".  basename( $_FILES['uploadedfile']['name']). 
    " has been uploaded</p>\n<p>To the directory:  <span style=\"font-weight:bold;\">".substr($target_path, 6)."</span></p>";
} else{
    echo "There was an error uploading the file, please try again!";
}
share|improve this answer
2  
ah cool! Works a treat. –  Max Jan 17 '11 at 15:31
1  
Glad I could help –  Matt Lowden Jan 17 '11 at 15:32
    
Be advised though: using chmod 755 means that the owner can read, write and execute. The group can now read and write. "Other" (anyone else) can read and write. Now, I assume that people won't be able to get into the directory, but if so, they could inject harmful stuff in your files. I'd always go for chmod 750 instead. –  Berry Langerak Jan 17 '11 at 15:33
    
I went for 644 in the end. –  Max Jan 17 '11 at 15:53
    
@Max Can you delete the files if you're using 644? Dont you need "execute" permission for that? –  StefanNch May 9 at 8:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.