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This question seems to have been asked a million times around the web, but I cannot find an answer which will work for me.

Basically, I have a CSV file which has a number of columns (say two). The program goes through each row in the CSV file, taking the first column value, then asks the user for the value to be placed in the second column. This is done on a handheld running Windows 6. I am developing using C#.

It seems a simple thing to do. But I cant seem to add text to a line.

I cant use OleDb, as System.Data.Oledb isnt in the .Net version I am using. I could use another CSV file, and when they complete each line, it writes it to another CSV file. But the problems with that are - The file thats produced at the end needs to contain EVERY line (so what if they pull the batterys out half way). And what if they go back, to continue doing this another time, how will the program know where to start back from.

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1 Answer 1

For every row, open the output file, append the new row to it, and then close the output file. To restart, count the number of rows in the existing output file from the previous run, which will give you your starting in the input file (i.e., skip that number of rows in the input file).

Edit: right at the start, use System.IO.File.Copy to copy the input file to the output file, so you have all the file in case of failure. Now open the input file, read a line, convert it, use File.ReadAllLines to read ALL of the output file into an array, replace the line you have changed at the right index in the array, then use File.WriteAllLines to write out the new output file.

Something like this:

string inputFileName = ""; // Use a sensible file name.
string outputFileName = ""; // Use a sensible file name.
File.Copy(inputFileName, outputFileName, true);
using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(inputFileName))
{
    string line = null;
    int inputLinesIndex = 0;
    while ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
    {
        string convertedLine = ConvertLine(line);
        string[] outputFileLines = File.ReadAllLines(outputFileName);
        if (inputLinesIndex < outputFileLines.Length)
        {
            outputFileLines[inputLinesIndex] = convertedLine;
            File.WriteAllLines(outputFileName, outputFileLines);
        }
        inputLinesIndex++;
    }
}
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Thanks for your help, but this doesnt solve the issue that the end file NEEDS to contain ALL lines from the original. So when they go back, or pull the batterys out, the file is the same as the original but with a certain amount of lines filled in –  MichaelMcCabe Jan 17 '11 at 16:56
    
The end file WILL contain all the lines from the original. Open the input file (the original file), read a line, convert the line as necessary, open the output file, append the converted line to the output file, close the output file, and repeat (read the next line). If you pull the battery out, the output file will have all the lines written to that point, so you can carry on where you left off. –  Polyfun Jan 17 '11 at 17:04
    
Sorry, I wasnt very clear. I need the end file to contain EVERYTHING from the original. Even if it wasnt completed, the end file needs to contain everything. (This CSV file will be used elsewhere). So if the input file contains 600 lines, and they complete 100. Then the output file needs to contain 600 lines with the first 100 complete. –  MichaelMcCabe Jan 17 '11 at 17:09
    
You mean if the user completes 100 before the battery is pulled out, you still want 600 lines in the file? OK, right at the start, using System.IO.File.Copy to copy the input file to the output file, so you have all the file in case of failure. Now open the input file, read a line, convert it, use File.ReadAllLines to read ALL of the output file into an array, replace the line you have changed at the right index in the array, then use File.WriteAllLines to write out the new output file. –  Polyfun Jan 17 '11 at 17:18

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