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I know about joins in SQL Server.

For example. there is two tables Table1, Table2.

There table structure are following.

create table Table1 (id int, Name varchar (10))

create table Table2 (id int, Name varchar (10))

Table1 Data as follows:

    Id     Name     
    -------------
    1      A        
    2      B    

Table2 Data as follows:

    Id     Name     
    -------------
    1      A        
    2      B 
    3      C

If I execute both below mentioned SQL statements, both outputs will be the same

select *
from Table1
  left join Table2 on Table1.id = Table2.id

select *
from Table2
  right join Table1 on Table1.id = Table2.id

Please explain the difference between left and right join in above sql statements.

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up vote 52 down vote accepted
Select * from Table1 left join Table2 ...

and

Select * from Table2 right join Table1 ...

are indeed completely interchangeable. Try however Table2 left join Table1 (or its identical pair, Table1 right join Table2) to see a difference. This query should give you more rows, since Table2 contains a row with an id which is not present in Table1.

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4  
So why do we need RIGHT JOIN if we can achieve any desired result with just LEFT JOIN? :P – Silap Aliyev Dec 15 '15 at 5:03
    
@SilapAliyev That's actually a very good question. Can anyone answer? :D – Ian Chu Te Jan 8 at 2:46
4  
Select * from Table1 left join Table 2 will return ALL the records of table 1 plus coincident records of Table 2. The opposite Select * from Table1 right join Table 2would return ALL records from Table 2 and coincident records of Table 1. Hopes it helps. – Programador Adagal Jan 12 at 16:09

Codeproject has this image which explains the simple basics of SQL joins, taken from: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/database/Visual_SQL_Joins.aspx SQL joins explained

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28  
This should be the answer instead. +1 for the detailed answer. – Ayase Eri Jan 16 '13 at 9:27
45  
There ain't much 'detail' in there. Credit should actually go to the codeproject page instead of to me. But I of course don't mind the attention :-) – Daan Timmer Jan 22 '13 at 12:41
3  
perfect answer. Thank you. – hd. Mar 16 '13 at 17:42
3  
Two extra points for the graphics – Curt Jul 26 '13 at 1:36
    
very nice large image – Ben Wilde Aug 12 '15 at 2:53

Table from which you are taking data is 'LEFT'.
Table you are joining is 'RIGHT'.
LEFT JOIN: Take all items from left table AND (only) matching items from right table.
RIGHT JOIN: Take all items from right table AND (only) matching items from left table.
So:

Select * from Table1 left join Table2 on Table1.id = Table2.id  

gives:

Id     Name       
-------------  
1      A          
2      B      

but:

Select * from Table1 right join Table2 on Table1.id = Table2.id

gives:

Id     Name       
-------------  
1      A          
2      B   
3      C  

you were right joining table with less rows on table with more rows
AND
again, left joining table with less rows on table with more rows
Try:

 If Table1.Rows.Count > Table2.Rows.Count Then  
    ' Left Join  
 Else  
    ' Right Join  
 End If  
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2  
THANK YOU! "Table from which you are taking data is 'LEFT'. Table you are joining is 'RIGHT'." – user25064 Jun 25 '14 at 14:29
select fields 
from tableA --left
left join tableB --right
on tableA.key = tableB.key

The table in the from in this example tableA, is on the left side of relation.

tableA <- tableB
[left]------[right]

So if you want to take all rows from the left table (tableA), even if there are no matches in the right table (tableB), you'll use the "left join".

And if you want to take all rows from the right table (tableB), even if there are no matches in the left table (tableA), you will use the right join.

Thus, the following query is equivalent to that used above.

select fields
from tableB 
right join tableA on tableB.key = tableA.key
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3  
Welcome to Stack Overflow. You should brush up on the formatting system. Also, people will often comment negatively whenever there is a reference to W3Schools, but that is neither here nor there, as long as the referenced information is valid and not against best code practices. – ChristopherW May 13 '13 at 15:10
    
Thanks for the advice ChristopherW, i'll pay attention in the next time. Best regards. – Moraes May 13 '13 at 16:09
    
This is the best explanation I have ever seen – Prisoner ZERO Dec 2 '14 at 14:55

You seem to be asking, "If I can rewrite a RIGHT OUTER JOIN using LEFT OUTER JOIN syntax then why have a RIGHT OUTER JOIN syntax at all?" I think the answer to this question is, because the designers of the language didn't want to place such a restriction on users (and I think they would have been criticized if they did), which would force users to change the order of tables in the FROM clause in some circumstances when merely changing the join type.

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sometimes left and right outer joins are completely interchangeable, correct? – アレックス Dec 25 '13 at 9:00
1  
@Alex: indeed left and right outer joins are always interchangeable. – onedaywhen Jan 6 '14 at 10:21

Your two statements are equivalent.

Most people only use LEFT JOIN since it seems more intuitive, and it's universal syntax - I don't think all RDBMS support RIGHT JOIN.

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"I don't think all RDBMS support RIGHT JOIN" -- sure, not all RDBMSs support SQL. But if you are implying that some SQL products support LEFT but not RIGHT then please indicate which ones. – onedaywhen Jan 18 '11 at 10:56
6  
@onedaywhen For example, SQLite 3 doesn't implement RIGHT and FULL OUTER JOIN : sqlite.org/omitted.html – Mac_Cain13 Dec 13 '12 at 10:19

I feel we may require "AND" condition in where clause of last figure of "Outer Excluding JOIN" so that we get the desired result of A Union B Minus A Interaction B. I feel query needs to be updated to

SELECT FROM Table_A A FULL OUTER JOIN Table_B B ON A.Key = B.Key WHERE A.Key IS NULL AND B.Key IS NULL

If we use OR , then we will get all the results of A Union B

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I ran this on sql server and it fetched the same results B LEFT JOIN A = A RIGHT JOIN B. Only Reason I could understand behind it "Ease of use and Convenience".

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