Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a .NET class I'd like to show in a DataGridView, and the default databinding - setting the DGV's DataSource to the object - produces 90% of my requirements (i.e. it's outputting the public properties correctly and I can add sorting easily).

However, one of the properties I need to bind is a List which contains data which needs to be in separate columns after the other databound items. I'm stuck on how best to implement this.

My class looks something like this:

public class BookDetails
{
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public int TotalRating { get; set; }
    public int Occurrence { get; set; }
    public List<int> Rating { get; set; }
}

Ideally, I'd be able to expand that Rating property into a number of numeric columns to give an output like this at runtime:

Title | Total Rating | Occurrence | R1 | R2 | R3 ... RN

It would also be useful to have Total Rating be calculated as the sum of all the individual ratings, but I'm updating that manually at the moment without issue.

share|improve this question
    
You are going to have to implement a TypeDescriptor (or maybe TypeConverter) for the type. Quite trivial if you know what to do. Unfortunately a nice example I have written is at work now. –  leppie Jan 17 '11 at 18:08
    
@leppie - TypeConverter doesn't apply here; actually, ITypedList is probably the easiest; after that - TypeDescriptionProvider (since it won't use ICustomTypeDescriptor for a typed list) –  Marc Gravell Jan 17 '11 at 19:37
1  
@leppie - we must be the only two fools I know mad enough to mess with this dark corner of the framework ;p –  Marc Gravell Jan 17 '11 at 19:59
    
(you can also make it read-write, but that gets a little messy because you need to know per-row the length of the list; a bit of a pain...) –  Marc Gravell Jan 17 '11 at 20:02
    
@ Marc Gravell: Heh :) IIRC, my solution simply inherits from BindingSource. Seems the same as your answer. –  leppie Jan 17 '11 at 20:06
show 3 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Like this?

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Linq;
using System.Windows.Forms;
public class BookDetails
{
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public int TotalRating { get; set; }
    public int Occurrence { get; set; }
    public List<int> Rating { get; set; }
}
class BookList : List<BookDetails>, ITypedList
{

    public PropertyDescriptorCollection GetItemProperties(PropertyDescriptor[] listAccessors)
    {
        var origProps = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(typeof(BookDetails));
        List<PropertyDescriptor> newProps = new List<PropertyDescriptor>(origProps.Count);
        PropertyDescriptor doThisLast = null;
        foreach (PropertyDescriptor prop in origProps)
        {

            if (prop.Name == "Rating") doThisLast = prop;
            else newProps.Add(prop);
        }
        if (doThisLast != null)
        {
            var max = (from book in this
                       let rating = book.Rating
                       where rating != null
                       select (int?)rating.Count).Max() ?? 0;
            if (max > 0)
            {
                // want it nullable to account for jagged arrays
                Type propType = typeof(int?); // could also figure this out from List<T> in
                                              // the general case, but make it nullable
                for (int i = 0; i < max; i++)
                {
                    newProps.Add(new ListItemDescriptor(doThisLast, i, propType));
                }
            }
        }
        return new PropertyDescriptorCollection(newProps.ToArray());
    }

    public string GetListName(PropertyDescriptor[] listAccessors)
    {
        return "";
    }
}
class ListItemDescriptor : PropertyDescriptor
{
    private static readonly Attribute[] nix = new Attribute[0];
    private readonly PropertyDescriptor tail;
    private readonly Type type;
    private readonly int index;
    public ListItemDescriptor(PropertyDescriptor tail, int index, Type type) : base(tail.Name + "[" + index + "]", nix)
    {
        this.tail = tail;
        this.type = type;
        this.index = index;
    }
    public override object GetValue(object component)
    {
        IList list = tail.GetValue(component) as IList;
        return (list == null || list.Count <= index) ? null : list[index];
    }
    public override Type PropertyType
    {
        get { return type; }
    }
    public override bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get { return true; }
    }
    public override void SetValue(object component, object value)
    {
        throw new NotSupportedException();
    }
    public override void ResetValue(object component)
    {
        throw new NotSupportedException();
    }
    public override bool CanResetValue(object component)
    {
        return false;
    }
    public override Type ComponentType
    {
        get { return tail.ComponentType; }
    }
    public override bool ShouldSerializeValue(object component)
    {
        return false;
    }
}
static class Program
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        Application.EnableVisualStyles();
        var data = new BookList {
            new BookDetails { Title = "abc", TotalRating = 3, Occurrence = 2, Rating = new List<int> {1,2,1}},
            new BookDetails { Title = "def", TotalRating = 3, Occurrence = 2, Rating = null },
            new BookDetails { Title = "ghi", TotalRating = 3, Occurrence = 2, Rating = new List<int> {3, 2}},
            new BookDetails { Title = "jkl", TotalRating = 3, Occurrence = 2, Rating = new List<int>()},
        };
        Application.Run(new Form
        {
            Controls = {
                new DataGridView {
                    Dock = DockStyle.Fill,
                    DataSource = data
                }
            }
        });

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
(I've also glossed over the whole "list accessor" thing - if you need that, it it just a case of following each call through the chain) –  Marc Gravell Jan 17 '11 at 20:05
    
+1 Cool, slightly more complicated than I thought, due to having a variable amount of items in the List :) –  leppie Jan 17 '11 at 20:08
    
Perfect! works like a charm for me. Thank you very much :) –  vitorbal Jan 17 '11 at 20:51
    
this solution is very interesting. I'm going to have to investigate ITypedList and the whole PropertyDescriptor/TypeDescriptor field. I'm running through the code in the debugger and learning a lot, so many thanks :) –  Dave R. Jan 18 '11 at 0:06
    
Insanely useful and concise. Thanks for this. –  misnomer Dec 31 '12 at 17:10
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.