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It seems there are a few different ways to read and write data using files.

I am trying to read ASCII data from a file. What are the differences so that I can decide what the best way is?

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8  
I also disagree with closing as "not constructive". Fortunately, this could well be closed as duplicate. Good answers e.g. in How to create a String from the contents of a file?, What is simplest way to read a file into String?, What are the simplest classes for reading files? –  Jonik Dec 29 '13 at 13:35
    
Without loops: {{{ Scanner sc = new Scanner(file, "UTF-8"); sc.useDelimiter("$^"); // regex matching nothing String text = sc.next(); sc.close(); }}} –  Aivar Apr 28 at 18:58
    
it's so interesting that there is nothing like "read()" in python , to read the whole file to a string –  kommradHomer Oct 21 at 8:44

8 Answers 8

up vote 146 down vote accepted

ASCII is a TEXT file so you would use Readers for reading. Java also supports reading from a binary file using InputStreams. If the files being read are huge then you would want to use a BufferedReader on top of a FileReader to improve read performance.

Go through this article on how to use a Reader

I'd also recommend you download and read this wonderful (yet free) book called Thinking In Java

In Java 7

new String(Files.readAllBytes(...)) or Files.readAllLines(...)

In Java 8

Files.lines(..).forEach(...)

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2  
Picking a Reader really depends on what you need the content of the file for. If the file is small(ish) and you need it all, it's faster (benchmarked by us: 1.8-2x) to just use a FileReader and read everything (or at least large enough chunks). If you're processing it line by line then go for the BufferedReader. –  Vlad Aug 27 '13 at 13:45
1  
The first 4 links are not valid any more. –  Alexandru Barbarosie Dec 6 '13 at 21:41
    
@AlexandruBarbarosie The links are fixed –  Pangea Jan 13 at 23:57
2  
To simply read a textfile the easiest way is the best! In Java7 you'd use new String(Files.readAllBytes(...)) or Files.readAllLines(...). In Java8 you'd most likely want to use Files.lines(..).forEach(...) –  kritzikratzi Mar 23 at 18:45
1  
@kritzikratzi thank you. updated the post –  Pangea Mar 23 at 23:15

My favorite way to read a small file is to use a BufferedReader and a StringBuilder. It is very simple and to the point (though not particularly effective, but good enough for most cases):

    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("file.txt"));
    try {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        String line = br.readLine();

        while (line != null) {
            sb.append(line);
            sb.append(System.lineSeparator());
            line = br.readLine();
        }
        String everything = sb.toString();
    } finally {
        br.close();
    }

Some has pointed out that after Java 7 you should use auto close features:

    try(BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("file.txt"))) {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        String line = br.readLine();

        while (line != null) {
            sb.append(line);
            sb.append(System.lineSeparator());
            line = br.readLine();
        }
        String everything = sb.toString();
    }

When I read strings like this, I usually want to do some string handling per line anyways, so then I go for this implementation.

Though if I want to actually just read a file into a String, I always use Apache Commons IO with the class IOUtils.toString() method. You can have a look at the source here:

http://www.docjar.com/html/api/org/apache/commons/io/IOUtils.java.html

    FileInputStream inputStream = new FileInputStream("foo.txt");
    try {
        String everything = IOUtils.toString(inputStream);
    } finally {
        inputStream.close();
    }

And even simpler with Java 7:

    try(FileInputStream inputStream = new FileInputStream("foo.txt")) {
        Session IOUtils;
        String everything = IOUtils.toString(inputStream);
    }
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3  
I've made a small adjustment to stop adding a newline ( \n ) if the last line is reached. code while (line != null) { sb.append(line); line = br.readLine(); // Only add new line when curline is NOT the last line.. if(line != null) { sb.append("\n"); } }code –  Ramon Fincken Apr 16 '13 at 11:07
1  
I feel it is better to explicitly give the encoding option and use the FileInputStream rather than directly the FileReader ? See this question too stackoverflow.com/questions/696626/… `reader = new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream("<filePath>", "UTF-8"); –  Alex Punnen Jun 4 '13 at 6:43
1  
Similar to Apache Common IO IOUtils#toString() is sun.misc.IOUtils#readFully(), which is included in the Sun/Oracle JREs. –  gb96 Jul 5 '13 at 0:55
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For performance always call sb.append('\n') in preference to sb.append("\n") as a char is appended to the StringBuilder faster than a String –  gb96 Jul 5 '13 at 0:58
2  
there is no need to use readers directly and also no need for ioutils. java7 has built in methods to read an entire file/all lines: See docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/nio/file/… and docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/nio/file/… –  kritzikratzi Mar 23 at 18:48

The easiest way is to use the Scanner class in Java and the FileReader object. Simple example:

Scanner in = new Scanner(new FileReader("filename.txt"));

Scanner has several methods for reading in strings, numbers, etc... You can look for more information on this on the Java documentation page.

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6  
while (in.hasNext()) { System.out.println (in.next()); } –  gnB Apr 18 at 20:15
    
not so efficient like BufferedReader –  Hissain Aug 13 at 3:54
1  
@Hissain But much easier to use than BufferedReader –  Jesus Ramos Aug 13 at 4:38

Here's another way to do it without using external libraries:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.IOException;


public String readFile(String filename)
{
   String content = null;
   File file = new File(filename); //for ex foo.txt
   try {
       FileReader reader = new FileReader(file);
       char[] chars = new char[(int) file.length()];
       reader.read(chars);
       content = new String(chars);
       reader.close();
   } catch (IOException e) {
       e.printStackTrace();
   }
   return content;
}
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21  
Close the reader in finally –  PhiLho May 28 '13 at 13:50
4  
or use "try-with-resources" try(FileReader reader = new FileReader(file)) –  Hernán Eche Jan 16 at 13:04
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I noticed the file.length(), How well does this work with utf-16 files? –  Wayne Jan 30 at 3:02
    
This technique assumes that read() fills the buffer; that the number of chars equals the number of bytes; that the number of bytes fits into memory; and that the number of bytes fits into an integer. -1 –  EJP Aug 28 at 10:01

The methods within apache.commons.io.FileUtils may also be very handy, e.g.:

/**
 * Reads the contents of a file line by line to a List
 * of Strings using the default encoding for the VM.
 */
static List readLines(File file)
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Or if you prefer Guava (a more modern, actively maintained library), it has similar utilities in its Files class. Simple examples in this answer. –  Jonik Dec 29 '13 at 13:26
    
or you simply use the built in method to get all lines: docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/nio/file/… –  kritzikratzi Mar 23 at 18:50

What do you want to do with the text? Is the file small enough to fit into memory? I would try to find the simplest way to handle the file for your needs. The FileUtils library is very handle for this.

for(String line: FileUtils.readLines("my-text-file"))
    System.out.println(line);
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Where did you get FileUtils? –  toc777 Jul 20 '11 at 13:02
    
google.co.uk/search?q=FileUtils –  Peter Lawrey Jul 20 '11 at 15:44
1  
it's also built into java7: docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/nio/file/… –  kritzikratzi Mar 23 at 18:51

I don't see it mentioned yet in the other answers so far. But if "Best" means speed, then the new Java I/O (NIO) might provide the fastest preformance, but not always the easiest to figure out for someone learning.

http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/io/file.html

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This code I programmed is much faster for very large files:

public String readDoc(File f) {
    String text = "";
    int read, N = 1024 * 1024;
    char[] buffer = new char[N];

    try {
        FileReader fr = new FileReader(f);
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);

        while(true) {
            read = br.read(buffer, 0, N);
            text += new String(buffer, 0, read);

            if(read < N) {
                break;
            }
        }
    } catch(Exception ex) {
        ex.printStackTrace();
    }

    return text;
}
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3  
Much faster, I doubt it, if you use simple string concatenation instead of a StringBuilder... –  PhiLho May 28 '13 at 13:41
2  
I think the main speed gain is from reading in 1MB (1024 * 1024) blocks. However you could do the same simply by passing 1024 * 1024 as second arg to BufferedReader constructor. –  gb96 Jul 5 '13 at 0:50
    
i don't believe this is tested at all. using += in this way gives you quadratic (!) complexity for a task that should be linear complexity. this will start to crawl for files over a few mb. to get around this you should either keep the textblocks in a list<string> or use the aforementioned stringbuilder. –  kritzikratzi Mar 23 at 18:55
1  
Much faster than what? It most certainly is not faster than appending to a StringBuffer. -1 –  EJP Aug 28 at 10:02
    
@gb96 I thought the same about buffer sizes, but the detailed experiment in this question gave surprising results in a similar context: a 16KB buffer was consistently and noticeably faster. –  chiastic-security Sep 12 at 18:14

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