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I have an image that is a link. I want to show a different image when the user hovers over the link.

Currently I'm using this code:

<a href="http://twitter.com/me" title="Twitter link">
<div id="twitterbird" class="sidebar-poster"></div></a>

div.sidebar-poster {
margin-bottom: 10px;
background-position: center top;
background-repeat: no-repeat;
width: 160px;
}
#twitterbird {
background-image: url('twitterbird.png');
}
#twitterbird:hover {
background-image: url('twitterbird_hover.png');
}

But I'm having loads of problems: the div isn't picking up the CSS rules (the element just isn't showing the related CSS rules when I view it in Firebug).

Perhaps this is because (as I know) this is invalid HTML: you can't put an <a> around a <div>. However, if I switch to <span> then it seems I get bigger problems, because you can't set a height and width on a span reliably.

Help! How can I do this better?

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1  
Actually I think NOW putting <a> around a <div> is allowed. –  Trufa Jan 17 '11 at 19:47
    
Oh OK... In that case, any idea why the CSS isn't being picked up? I thought that if I used id on the element, and # in the CSS, it would always pick it up. –  AP257 Jan 17 '11 at 19:49
    
Block level links are fine if you're using the HTML5 doctype. html5doctor.com/block-level-links-in-html-5 –  John McCollum Jan 17 '11 at 19:49
    
what doctype are you using? in html5 a elements can contain block level elements. –  zzzzBov Jan 17 '11 at 19:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 70 down vote accepted
 <a href="http://twitter.com/me" class="twitterbird" title="Twitter link"></a>

use a class for the link itself and forget the div

.twitterbird {
 margin-bottom: 10px;
 width: 160px;
 height:160px;
 display:block;
 background:transparent url('twitterbird.png') center top no-repeat;
}

.twitterbird:hover {
   background-image: url('twitterbird_hover.png');
}
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Awesome....working perfectly...!!! –  Sumit Munot Feb 5 at 23:35

If you have just a few places where you wish to create this effect, you can use the following html code that requires no css. Just insert it.

<a href="TARGET URL GOES HERE"><img src="URL OF FIRST IMAGE GOES HERE" 
onmouseover="this.src='URL OF IMAGE ON HOVER GOES HERE'"
onmouseout="this.src='URL OF FIRST IMAGE GOES HERE AGAIN'" /></A>

Be sure to write the quote marks exactly as they are here, or it will not work.

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I have tried this and it is assume. I understand that this is JavaScript... Could you kindly let me know how this can be done with CSS. If possible I need the actual code as an example. –  Matthew May 7 '13 at 20:57

That could be done with <a> only:

#twitterbird {
 display: block; /* 'convert' <a> to <div> */
 margin-bottom: 10px;
 background-position: center top;
 background-repeat: no-repeat;
 width: 160px;
 height: 160px;
 background-image: url('twitterbird.png');
}
#twitterbird:hover {
 background-image: url('twitterbird_hover.png');
}
share|improve this answer
    
You mean with something like <a href="" id="twitterbird"></a>? Unfortunately, that renders with width and height of 0 (even with the CSS classes you suggest) in Chrome. –  AP257 Jan 17 '11 at 20:25
    
okay, if I try a test page with just your suggestion it displays... so why have I got a height and width of 0 on my 'real' page? I've tried setting height: 160px ! important but it doesn't help... –  AP257 Jan 17 '11 at 20:29
    
...to explain: in Chrome Developer Tools, all the styles above show up under 'Matched Rules', but then in the 'Computed Style' section, the height and width are zero! For no apparent reason. Why? –  AP257 Jan 17 '11 at 20:31
    
I've created a new question for this: stackoverflow.com/questions/4717673/… –  AP257 Jan 17 '11 at 20:41

It can be better if you set the a element in this way

display:block;

and then by css sprites set your over background

Edit: check this example out http://jsfiddle.net/steweb/dTwtk/

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Thanks - I'll use sprites once I've worked out how to get the element itself displaying with a non-zero width. –  AP257 Jan 17 '11 at 20:33
    
If you set display:block, you should set a fixed width/height to the <a> element ;) –  stecb Jan 17 '11 at 20:48
    
also, check this example out jsfiddle.net/steweb/dTwtk ..it will help you ;) –  stecb Jan 17 '11 at 20:51

If you give generally give a span the property display:block, it'll then behave like a div, i.e you can set width and height.

You can also skip the div or span and just set the a the to display: block and apply the backgound style to it.

<a href="" class="myImage"><!----></a>


    <style>
      .myImage {display: block; width: 160px; height: 20px; margin:0 0 10px 0; background: url(image.png) center top no-repeat;}
.myImage:hover{background-image(image_hover.png);}
    </style>
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try this...

css

.urlImg {
    width: 185px;
    height:185px;
    display:block;
    background-image: url('img/duck.png');
}
.urlImg:hover {
    background-image: url('img/peng.png');
}

HTML

just call the class in href element

<a href="http://www.corelangs.com/about.html" class="urlImg" title="Corelangs link"></a>

Full source code...URL Image change on Hover

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